Posts Tagged ‘job’

QOF 2012/13 changes summary

March 16, 2012

QOF guidance 2012-2013 (fifth revision)

As part of the 2012-2013 GMS contract changes, the General Practitioners Committee (GPC) and NHS Employers have agreed a number of changes to the quality and outcomes framework (QOF) effective from 1 April 2012.

The key changes are:

  • the retirement of seven indicators (CHD13, AF4, QP1, QP2, QP3, QP4, QP5) releasing 45 points to fund new and replacement indicators
  • the replacement of seven indicators with eight NICE recommended replacement indicators, focusing on six clinical areas namely Diabetes, Mental Health, Asthma, Depression, Atrial Fibrillation and Smoking
  • the introduction of nine new NICE recommended clinical indicators, including two new clinical areas (Atrial Fibrillation, Smoking, PAD and Osteoporosis)
  • the introduction of three new organisational indicators for improving Quality and Productivity which focus on Accident and Emergency attendances
  • amendments to indicator wording for CHD9, CHD10, CHD14, Stroke12, DM26, DM27, DM28 and DEM3
  • inclusion of telephone reviews for Epilepsy 6

Quality and productivity indicators
The six quality and productivity (QP) indicators covering outpatient referrals and emergency admissions have been agreed for a further year. Three new QP indicators on Accident and Emergency (A&E) attendances have been introduced for one year and are aimed at reducing avoidable A&E attendances. These indicators continue to be aimed at securing a more effective use of NHS resources through improvements in the quality of primary care.

Miscellaneous changes
In addition to the above, a number of other changes have been agreed as follows:

Changes to the points values for the following indicators:

  • BP4 – reduced by eight points to eight points
  • BP5 – reduced by two points to 55 points
  • DM2 – reduced by two points to one point
  • DM22 – reduced by two points to one point
  • CKD2 – reduced by two points to four points
  • Smoking3 (now Smoking5) – reduced by five points to 25 points
  • Smoking4 (now Smoking6) – reduced by five points to 25 points

A number of threshold changes as follows:

  1. raising all lower thresholds for indicators currently 40-90% to 50-90%,
  2. raising all lower thresholds for indicators currently with an upper threshold between 70-85%      to 45%,
  3. a number of upper threshold changes for indicators CHD6, CHD10, PP1, PP2, HF4, STROKE6, STROKE8, DM17, DM31, and COPD10
  4. lower and upper threshold changes for BP5, MH10 and DEM2

ASTHMA3 has been renumbered to ASTHMA10 following a change to the business rules to include a new exception cluster.

DEP4 has been renumbered to DEP6 following a change to the prevalence calculation to apply to all new diagnosis of depression from April 2006.

MH14 has been renumbered to MH19 following a change to the business rules to include an exclusion cluster for patients already diagnosed with CVD.

Records23 has moved into the clinical domain and the supporting business rules have been amended. This indicator is renumbered to Smoking7.

Education1 has been renumbered to Education11 due a change to the indicator wording.

Summary of Allocation of Clinical Domain points

CLINICAL DOMAIN  2012/13 QOF  POINTS

Secondary prevention of coronary heart disease   48

Cardiovascular disease – primary prevention  13

Heart failure 29

Stroke and Transient Ischaemic Attack  22

Hypertension 69

Diabetes mellitus  88

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease 30

Epilepsy  14

Hypothyroidism  7

Cancer 11

Palliative care 6

Mental health 40

Asthma 45

Dementia 26

Depression 31

Chronic kidney disease 36

Atrial fibrillation 27

Obesity 8

Learning disabilities 7

Smoking 73

Peripheral arterial disease 9

Osteoporosis : secondary prevention of fragility fractures 9

If you have found this informative please visit the  2020 Selection website where you will find many other relevant Factsheets in the Candidates Section

Source: http://www.nhsemployers.org The full QOF guidance is available to download from this site

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Trainee Recruitment Consultant – A Day In The Life Of Chris

January 26, 2012

Last week I started a training contract within an established Medical Sales recruitment company  As a virgin to the industry I prepared myself as best I could for what I was about to undertake. I did all my reading around the career area and the company itself and eventually it came down to taking the plunge and accepting a 2 week trial in a very unpredictable time period for a recruitment consultant, the 2 weeks preceding the Christmas break. This is obviously an odd time in the industry as our Clients will be in one of 2 camps, the 1st of which being the “lets get the most out of our budget spend before the end of the year before its taken away from us in January”, and the 2nd being, “I’ve done all I can this year, lets start again in 2012”.

My 1st day was, as expected, the birth by fire. This is how we operate, take in as much as you can and see if you can keep up. This gave me a great insight into the speed, efficiency, and accuracy required from a consultant. If you’re not 1st, you’re last. This ethos opens up possibilities for huge success but at the same time great falls. After all we are competing against several other companies with differing approaches to achieving the same goal, luckily for me I’m working on the basis of quality rather than quantity. But that doesn’t mean quantity doesn’t get it right some times.

The harsh reality of the other side of recruitment fast became apparent. You really have to shine to get noticed in the current climate and the vast array of approaches that candidates use to attain this is eye opening. The role itself is very diverse. Admin is air tight, and has to be. It can be the difference between placing and missing out, a point regularly re-enforced during my training thus far. Combine admin with confident selective telephone manner, excellent knowledge of your clients and candidates, and the foresight to combine the two and you may have what it takes to take on the world of recruitment.

The industry requires you to effectively sit on a knife edge, the whole game is in balance, continually changing as both clients and candidates change their ‘requirements’, which can either push you right to the top or plunge you back to square one. This makes for a very exciting work environment as we are challenged with the task of keeping the balance in our favour right until the very last minute and then if all goes to plan, we can tip the scales and reap the benefit.

The team currently have the task of not only managing business but also managing me. As a fresh starter I am as keen and eager as you’d expect. I want to get my hands dirty and dive straight in but my lack of experience leaves me blind to the consequence. I am effectively stood on top of a diving board blindfold, trusting my team for direction and timing so I land on soft success rather than the hard ground of misconception. Time will tell……

Pharmaceutical Sales – A spark of interest

April 23, 2010

Having embarked on a career as a medical representative in 1987, I still reflect on the route that led me to the pharmaceutical industry.  Being a Pharmaceutical Sales Representative doesn’t often appear in the list of careers that we aspire to as teenagers hence it is invariably something people come across coincidently.  For me I spent five years in a hospital Biochemistry Dept completing post graduate studies and developing a strong clinical understanding of various diseases and illnesses.  It was here I met Sales Representatives selling laboratory diagnostics and equipment which sparked an interest in sales (I have to admit to being initially impressed by the suit, car and perceived flexibility of their job).  In fact what did appeal to me about a sales role was the inherent challenges working towards targets and ultimately being rewarded (bonus) and recognised for exceeding goals (working in the NHS could not fulfil that need) as well as selling products which genuinely make a difference to people’s lives.

Hence I started buying the New Scientist and Daily Telegraph; there was no internet job searching in those days! Quite quickly I secured two interviews for Laboratory Territory Manager positions before seeing an advertisement for Trainee Medical Representatives with a major pharmaceutical company.

Have to confess at that stage that pharmaceuticals was a bit of a mystery to me, but my Dad said that company was great (blue-chip), and there was a number to call to apply.  Two interviews later, including being flown to head office, I was offered a GP/Hospital Representative position.

Looking back I do wonder how I got that job as these days we expect entry level candidates to know so much more about the day to day practicalities of the role, the NHS and how the business works.  Clearly the company were looking for the basic ingredients which they could then train, develop and mould to reflect their values and culture in the eyes of their customers;  GP, Nurses, Pharmacists, Consultants, Registrars, SHO etc.

Over twenty years later in a different NHS landscape I still believe this to be true so what are some of those basics;

Personal Qualities – An inner drive, self-starter, the ability to work on your own initiative, enthusiasm, can-do attitude, tenacity, the ability to problem solve, good interpersonal skills, the willingness as well as aptitude to learn.

Clinical Foundation – This means an interest in medicine, the ability to learn and apply technical information.  You will need to communicate this knowledge to customers of all levels.  ‘A’ level standard Biology should help with ABPI. 

Business & Selling Skills – Understand you are there to increase sales; it is a sales job & not a promotional or educational position.  Have a consultative selling style, i.e. probe to understand the customer needs and agenda before offering solutions. Key Account Management & Networking Skills. Understanding local NHS politics, targets, agenda and how these may impact on your business.

Clearly a lot of clinical and business skills can be taught as long as you have the right positive attitude. In summary I would describe the role of a Medical Sales Representative, whether that be GP, GP/Hospital, Hospital or Generics as the opportunity to run your own local business.

I have enjoyed a varied, challenging and satisfying career in the pharmaceutical industry. I also know others, who embarked on their career at the same time, who have had similar experiences and taken their careers in to different functions in the industry including: Marketing, Senior Sales Management, Training, Consultancy as well as others who are now Senior Representatives such as Hospital Specialist Representative or Healthcare Development Manager.

If this sparks an interest in you fantastic!  To discuss your background and transferable skills then contact 20:20 Selection Ltd on 0845 026 2020 or visit www.2020selection.co.uk . We have current opportunities Nationwide with hot-spots in London, Kent, Sussex, Essex, Somerset, Wiltshire, East Anglia.

Interview Guidance

February 4, 2010

Interview Guidance

PRIOR TO the Interview

Research

  • Look committed and find out as much as possible about the company.

 

  • Visit their web site for more information on the company.

 

  • Find out who will your competitors be and as much as possible about the market/customers you will be selling to 

 

Job Description

  • Make sure you are fully aware what the role is you are being interviewed for.  Your consultant at 20:20 Selection Ltd will have fully briefed you on this. 

 

  • Be confident that you are technically qualified to do the job.  We would not have spoken to you about the role if we didn’t think your profile matched the client’s criteria!

 

  • Have examples from your previous roles to demonstrate your ability to do this job and evidence in your brag file to back this up

 

FOR THE INTERVIEW

Personal Presentation

  • Look your smartest and show your most professional side during the interview. A company is more likely to employ someone who is well presented and who will therefore best represent their company to customers. 

 

Punctuality

  • Arrive to start the interview on time (be early if possible)

 

  • Obtain clear directions for the location of the interview and plan your journey, allowing plenty of time to arrive.

 

INTERVIEW DO’S

  • Introduce yourself courteously (first impressions last!)

 

  • Express yourself clearly.

 

  • Show tact, manners, courtesy, and maturity at every opportunity.

 

  • Be confident and maintain poise. The ability to handle your nerves during the interview will come across as confidence in your ability to handle the job.

 

  • Be prepared to show how your experience would benefit the company.

 

  • Ask questions concerning the company or products and the position for which you are being interviewed for. An interviewer will be impressed by an eager and inquisitive mind. You will also be able to demonstrate that you can contribute to the company or industry if you show an interest in its products and/or services.

 

  • Take time to think and construct your answers to questions to avoid rushing into a vague and senseless reply.
  • Demonstrate that you are sufficiently motivated to get the job done well and that you will fit in with the company’s organisational structure and the team in which you will work.

 

  • Show willingness to start at the bottom and work up.

 

  • Anticipate questions you’re likely to be asked and have answers prepared in advance. Uncertainty and disorganisation show the interviewer that you are unprepared and unclear what your goals are.

 

  • Be assertive without being aggressive (ensure you close – remember you are a sales person & ‘you’ are your product)

 

  • Thank the interviewer for their time

 

Interview Don’ts

  • Be late for the interview. Tardiness is a sign of irresponsibility or disorganisation and the employer could take it as what to expect in the future.

 

  • Arrive unprepared for the interview.

 

  • Say unfavourable things about previous employers.

 

  • Make excuses for failings.

 

  • Give vague responses to questions.

 

  • Show lack of career planning – no goals or purpose could convey the impression you’re merely shopping around or only want the job for a short time.

 

  • Show too much concern about rapid advancement.

 

  • Overemphasise money. Your interviewing goal is to sell yourself to the interviewer and to get an offer of employment. Salary discussion is secondary.

 

  • Show any reservations you may have about the role/company. You can always turn down second interviews and job offers after you have had time to appraise your concerns in the cold light of day.

 

  • Express strong prejudices or any personal intolerance.

 

  • Leave your mobile phone on during the interview.

 

These are general tips that can be applied to any interview situation.  Part of the service we offer at 20:20 Selection Ltd is to help you prepare for specific client interviews.  We have key account managers specifically working with clients & members of the team who come from a pharmaceutical sales management background so you will get personalised expert advice relating to your interview!  To find out more about 20:20 Selection Ltd visit www.2020selection.co.uk

The New Year brings a new addition to the Recruitment Team at 20:20 Selection Ltd.

January 25, 2010

                                                            PRESS RELEASE

The New Year brings a new addition to the Recruitment Team at 20:20 Selection Ltd.

In the summer of 2008, Samantha Harrison, was the proud winner of the prestigious Pharma Times Senior RBM of the Year Award. At the start of 2010, she has begun the New Year with an exciting new challenge, by proudly joining the 20:20 Selection team as their new Recruitment Consultant.

Sam joined the pharmaceutical industry over 20 years ago as a Medical Sales Representative, and since then, she has worked in a wide variety of roles in her career, in both pharmaceuticals and in the CSO marketplace. Sam has extremely wide experience to bring to 20:20 Selection, having been an Oncology Hospital Specialist, a Field Trainer, a Regional Business Manager, Management Trainer, National Sales Manager, Operations Manager and most recently, as a Project Director at Innovex (UK) Ltd, managing multiple vacancy management teams for major clients in the pharmaceutical and healthcare industries.

Karen says, “Sam has built numerous teams for pharmaceutical companies in her time at both Innovex and Ashfield, so she has a great deal of experience and expertise in the field of recruitment. Sam understands exactly what kind of candidates our clients need, in order for them to compete in an increasingly demanding market. I know from first hand experience of working with her in the past, that she has the skill set to do a great job, and also a superb attitude that will help her to fit in perfectly at 20:20 Selection. She is talented, professional and extremely hard working. Those factors are crucial in recruitment.”

Sam has always kept an eye on the successful growth of 20:20 Selection since Karen Forshaw, 20:20’s Director, started the company. Sam and Karen have known each other for a long time, as they were colleagues together at Roche Pharmaceuticals, back in the mid 1990’s. Formed in 2002, 20:20 Selection Ltd has built a reputation for providing unrivalled recruitment services in terms of its commitment and dedication to both candidates and clients. “The reputation for quality that Karen and the team have developed within the market place is the main reason that I was so keen to come on board”, explains Sam. “I am delighted to be part of the team at 20:20 Selection”.

Nurse Advisor and similar roles within the Pharmaceutical Industry

July 20, 2009

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