Archive for the ‘Uncategorized’ Category

March 16, 2012

Good data for Diphtheria….
http://ping.fm/0It74

QOF 2012/13 changes summary

March 16, 2012

QOF guidance 2012-2013 (fifth revision)

As part of the 2012-2013 GMS contract changes, the General Practitioners Committee (GPC) and NHS Employers have agreed a number of changes to the quality and outcomes framework (QOF) effective from 1 April 2012.

The key changes are:

  • the retirement of seven indicators (CHD13, AF4, QP1, QP2, QP3, QP4, QP5) releasing 45 points to fund new and replacement indicators
  • the replacement of seven indicators with eight NICE recommended replacement indicators, focusing on six clinical areas namely Diabetes, Mental Health, Asthma, Depression, Atrial Fibrillation and Smoking
  • the introduction of nine new NICE recommended clinical indicators, including two new clinical areas (Atrial Fibrillation, Smoking, PAD and Osteoporosis)
  • the introduction of three new organisational indicators for improving Quality and Productivity which focus on Accident and Emergency attendances
  • amendments to indicator wording for CHD9, CHD10, CHD14, Stroke12, DM26, DM27, DM28 and DEM3
  • inclusion of telephone reviews for Epilepsy 6

Quality and productivity indicators
The six quality and productivity (QP) indicators covering outpatient referrals and emergency admissions have been agreed for a further year. Three new QP indicators on Accident and Emergency (A&E) attendances have been introduced for one year and are aimed at reducing avoidable A&E attendances. These indicators continue to be aimed at securing a more effective use of NHS resources through improvements in the quality of primary care.

Miscellaneous changes
In addition to the above, a number of other changes have been agreed as follows:

Changes to the points values for the following indicators:

  • BP4 – reduced by eight points to eight points
  • BP5 – reduced by two points to 55 points
  • DM2 – reduced by two points to one point
  • DM22 – reduced by two points to one point
  • CKD2 – reduced by two points to four points
  • Smoking3 (now Smoking5) – reduced by five points to 25 points
  • Smoking4 (now Smoking6) – reduced by five points to 25 points

A number of threshold changes as follows:

  1. raising all lower thresholds for indicators currently 40-90% to 50-90%,
  2. raising all lower thresholds for indicators currently with an upper threshold between 70-85%      to 45%,
  3. a number of upper threshold changes for indicators CHD6, CHD10, PP1, PP2, HF4, STROKE6, STROKE8, DM17, DM31, and COPD10
  4. lower and upper threshold changes for BP5, MH10 and DEM2

ASTHMA3 has been renumbered to ASTHMA10 following a change to the business rules to include a new exception cluster.

DEP4 has been renumbered to DEP6 following a change to the prevalence calculation to apply to all new diagnosis of depression from April 2006.

MH14 has been renumbered to MH19 following a change to the business rules to include an exclusion cluster for patients already diagnosed with CVD.

Records23 has moved into the clinical domain and the supporting business rules have been amended. This indicator is renumbered to Smoking7.

Education1 has been renumbered to Education11 due a change to the indicator wording.

Summary of Allocation of Clinical Domain points

CLINICAL DOMAIN  2012/13 QOF  POINTS

Secondary prevention of coronary heart disease   48

Cardiovascular disease – primary prevention  13

Heart failure 29

Stroke and Transient Ischaemic Attack  22

Hypertension 69

Diabetes mellitus  88

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease 30

Epilepsy  14

Hypothyroidism  7

Cancer 11

Palliative care 6

Mental health 40

Asthma 45

Dementia 26

Depression 31

Chronic kidney disease 36

Atrial fibrillation 27

Obesity 8

Learning disabilities 7

Smoking 73

Peripheral arterial disease 9

Osteoporosis : secondary prevention of fragility fractures 9

If you have found this informative please visit the  2020 Selection website where you will find many other relevant Factsheets in the Candidates Section

Source: http://www.nhsemployers.org The full QOF guidance is available to download from this site

February 21, 2012

Latest on the NHS Health Bill http://ping.fm/ydhfN

New opportunity – Clinical Therapeutics Specialist – Orphan products – Northern UK/ Southern UK/ Ireland – Excellent reward package – 4724

February 20, 2012

Clinical Therapeutics Specialist – Orphan Product – New product launch opportunity.

Three territories:-

1. Northern England & Scotland

2. Southern England & Wales

3. Ireland

As a medical sales professional launching a new entity in to the market is one of the most thrilling and challenging career landmarks. For our client, there is just one chance to bring their new product to market; hence we are in search of an elite salesperson who can establish a breakthrough treatment in key centres across your territories. You must:
– Thrive in a fast-paced working environment
– Be able to work with your internal and external stakeholders to drive through results
– Understand the market dynamics, particularly around funding and use of Orphan status products
– Have sound planning skills with strong commercial judgement
– Be motivated by the ultimate goal of improving patients’ lives

Critical to your success will be the ability to remove any barriers to usage of the specialist product so as all relevant patients who would benefit have access to the drug. You would need to;
– Develop and execute specific account plans
– Communicate disease and product knowledge effectively
– Create a long-term ‘partnership’ and value propositions with all key stakeholders

This is a high profile sales role requiring a range of transferable skills and knowledge; it is likely you can demonstrate the following:
– A proven track record of sales success in your pharmaceutical/biotech career to date
– Experience of selling in a highly specialist market (Orphan products, other high cost:low volume areas)
– An understanding of the healthcare regulatory environment
– Excellence in selling skills, account management and networking
– Prior product launch experience will be an advantage
– Degree level education
– Valid UK driving license (max 6 pts)
You will need to able to cover your territory effectively so a willingness to travel/stay overnight, as the business requires, is a must.

The successful person will be joining a new sales team and be at the forefront of future growth plans for this ambitious company. On offer is a top end basic salary plus an extensive benefits package.
To be considered for this exciting vacancy please send your CV to administrator@2020selection.co.uk or call our specialist team on 0845 026 2020.

http://ping.fm/mJhe3

Global Top Ten Pharma Company based in SE England recruiting for a Training Manager

February 1, 2012

This is just one of many live vacancies that are being advertised by 20:20 Selection. Please visit the website to see all these exciting opportunities in the UK Pharmaceutical Industry.

Training Manager, specialist products division within the pharmaceutical business of a global healthcare company.

An opportunity currently exists for a talented training and development manager to be responsible for delivering programmes in line with agreed company training strategy. You will focus on specialist therapy areas such as renal and neurology (Parkinson Disease). Additionally you would also be the point of contact point and coordinator, for the UK implementation of the E-Learning strategy

This is a Head Office based role (Berkshire) requiring you to work cross functionally with marketing, medical and sales management in order to offer the highest quality training solutions, your responsibilities will include:
– Coordinating and running induction/initial training
– Providing ongoing support across the franchise for new campaigns, conference etc.
– Working with brand teams to identify desired training outcomes that will support brand plan execution
– Supporting growth plans within division and working with other Training Managers to develop and deliver training plans
– Annual planning, ensuring adherence to budget and deadlines.
 
To be considered for this exciting position you are likely to:
– Have healthcare related sales experience having demonstrated achievements in sales & your career to date
– Have some prior training experience with a training qualification being an advantage
– Show potential to be innovative and creative in approach to both the design and delivery of training programmes
– Demonstrate good coaching and counselling skills
– Possess well-developed interpersonal skills with the adaptability to work cross-functionally within the company
– Have excellent planning skills with the drive to see projects through to completion
– Be able to work well under pressure & have a high level of flexibility.
It is likely that you are educated to degree level and are ideally ABPI qualified.

On offer to the successful person will be a highly competitive basic salary and benefits package. This is a superb opportunity to join a forward thinking team in a company who truly believe in investing in people.

Please don’t delay in applying. Email your CV to administrator@2020selection.co.uk and/or call on of our recruitment consultants on 0845 026 2020.

New Role Just In – Hospital Sales Specialist ( NE, Yorks, East Mids)

January 31, 2012

Hospital Sales Specialist – Basic to £45k, OTE £60k++

Many more live vacancies can be viewed at http://www.2020selection.co.uk

An opportunity to develop your talents working for a leading global Healthcare Company. Our client is currently looking for a Sales Specialist to develop the business in key hospital accounts throughout the North East,YorkshireandEast Midlands. Although a large geographical area this is a focused and targeted role with an emphasis on key account management.

This organisation has built an enviable portfolio of products and services that push back the frontiers of medical care and ultimately ensuring a better quality of life for people everywhere.

This opportunity for a Sales Specialist is an integral part of a specialty sales team reporting to the National Sales & Marketing Manager. You would be fully supported by internal functions such as marketing, customer services, logistics and shared services; YOU would be the interface of the company and the customer. With a drive for increased Patient Safety, in the NHS, when administering medication, our client is an excellent position to develop partnerships in hospital trusts. This role will involve selling new  as well as some established products and services.

Key responsibilities would include:

– Developing and implementing appropriate strategies for agreed customer targets with the objective of driving sales results and achieving or exceeding budgets.

– To identify key finance and clinical decision makers within Consortia, Hospitals and Units and arrange meetings to promote relevant products and services

– Gathering intelligence on customer plans and purchasing intentions and recommend responsive, timely and appropriate action.

– Maintaining a high level of knowledge of the therapy area and related products

– In conjunction with the National Sales Manager and wider commercial management team, provide informed input into/manage the tender process.

– Calling on key customers as per your business plan (Clinical/Aspectic/Purchasing Pharmacists, Procurement, Clinicians, Specialist Nurses)

To be considering for this exciting opportunity you are likely to have

– Previous hospital sales experience (2 years)

– Knowledge/Experience of NHS structure & buying processes

– Life sciences degree, nursing qualification, business degree (or equivalent experience inUKhealthcare market for minimum of 2 years)

– ABPI qualification and/or willing to study if required.

In return for your expertise if successful you will be offered a competitive salary & excellent benefits package including an uncapped bonus scheme. You will also receive first rate training and ongoing development.

To discuss this role in more detail please contact us on 0845 026 2020 or alternatively please submit your details by emailing administrator@2020selection.co.uk

20:20Selection Ltd promises to treat your application as important and will review your profile against our client’s requirements. However, if you have not heard from us within 7 days please assume that on this occasion you have not been successful.

Primary Care Medical Sales Representative

January 3, 2012

Primary Care Representative

A Primary Care Representative is an ABPI qualified Medical Sales Representative who concentrates their efforts in the primary care setting, with customers who work in the primary care arena.

The Primary Care setting consists of local GP surgeries/ Health Centres/ Medical Centres/  Walk-in-Centres/ Community Pharmacies/ Primary Care Trusts(PCTs) and Clinical Commissioning Groups(CCGs). These locations will house the customer base for the Primary Care Representative – for instance: GPs, practice nurses, practice managers, dieticians, practice pharmacists, non-medical prescribers, community pharmacists, PCT personnel ( medicines management team, medical director, prescribing lead).

A Primary Care Representative is responsible for business planning, budgetary planning and targeting, to make sure that they sell to the ‘right people and see them the right number of times’. It is the role of the Primary Care Representative to build trusted working relationships  with their customers  and to implement the marketing plan in their area. They work closely with colleagues in their team, such as Hospital Specialists and NHS Liaison Managers, sharing relevant information so that customers receive excellent service from the company, and so that product sales grow optimally.

Typically, a Primary Care Representative will be a graduate with a science based background, although graduates in the Humanities, Commerce or Law fields are also employed.  Occasionally, non-graduates with a good academic background and relevant background in sales may also be employed as Primary Care Representatives.  Nurses, pharmacists and other health care professionals can also make excellent sales representatiives if they have good commercial acumen and selling skills also. The most important qualities that an employer will be seeking in any potential Primary Care Representative are positive attitude, resourcefulness, commercial focus, good work ethic, ability to work autonomously, excellent planning and organisational skills, good time management skills and above all exceptional communication skills.

What is the typical working day of  a Primary Care Representative ? Having already planned the day several days or more in advance, they tend to see GP’s either during or after surgery in the morning, and see retail pharmacists and practice nurses in the afternoons.Their role is to build relationships with practice staff, doctors, nurses and retail pharmacists, to ensure that they create an environment where their products are most likely to be prescribed more frequently. These meetings will take the form of one-to-one discussions during which the Primary Care Representative will seek to understand the health care professional’s needs through appropriate questioning and enagement in a two way communication to sell the benefits of their product portfolio for the customer and for the patients. Promotional materials may be used to remind a reinforce product benefits of the Primary Care Representative’s visit but the nature of it’s content and the format is tightly controlled by the ABPI.

Alternatively, the Primary Care Representative could hold a structered meeting witht a wider audience which usually involves delivering a presentation during a luch time break at a GP surgery or to a larger audience perhaps at an after hours educational meeting led by Key Opinion Leaders. A meeting or appointment may be subject to change at short notice as the healthcare professional who the Primary Care Representative is going to visit may have to attend to the clinical needs of their patients, so it is always prudent to have several back-up plans and contingencies for each days work.

The success of a Primary Care Representative is largely measured by the sales of the products that they have in their portfolio. Sales data is usually collected by the amount of product that is sold into the pharmaceutical wholesalers and by the number of prescriptions that are processed by the NHS Business Services Authority who are the government agency responsible for reimbursing pharmacies for the NHS prescriptions that they have dispensed.

The Primary Care Representative may find themselves either employed directly by a manufacturer of a pharmaceutical product i.e. in what is known as a ‘headcount’ role or possibly as a part of a team of contract sales representatives, as either a dedicated or syndicated sales team.

Contract teams are run by organisations which specialise in putting sales teams into pharmaceutical companies who maybe wish to run a sales campaign for a limited period of time or want to assess the uptake of their product before they employ a large ‘headcount’ sales team. The pharmaceutical industry is held in very high regard for the excellent level of training that it gives it’s employees and for the ethical manner in which they work.

What I Wish I’d known As A Hiring Manager……….

December 13, 2010

It’s been almost a year since I joined 20:20 Selection Ltd as a Recruitment Consultant; and as we approach the shortest day and start the wind down for Christmas, I feel that it’s a good time to reflect on what I’ve learned over the last twelve months.

Firstly, I’ve realised that in the world of recruitment there isn’t a wind down for Christmas at all! In fact, at 20:20 Selection Limited we are still flat out busy, working on new vacancies as well as existing ones, for our clients who want jobs offered and filled over the next two weeks, in time for ITC’s on 4th January. I had naively thought that we would be starting on the mince pies and sherry by now, but in fact I suspect that the Season’s merriments won’t begin until 4pm on Friday 24th December.

When I was a hiring manager, both as a Regional Business Manager, and as a National Manager, I thought I knew quite a bit about recruitment. I thought I knew how to spot an outstanding candidate from an average one. I thought I knew how to really dig down deep to get to know the ‘face behind the mask’, so that I could recruit the best of the best; the gem who would fit into the team quickly and would add value from day one.

What I’ve now realised, is just how little I actually knew about recruitment when I was a hiring manager.

If only I’d known that:

  • An awful lot of work goes on behind the scenes, long before a manager receives CV’s to review.

 

  • For every strong potential candidate, the best agencies reject another hundred CV’s from the ‘Average Joe’.

 

  • The recruitment industry is incredibly competitive, with most clients now choosing a multi agency Preferred Supplier List.

 

  • Achieving exclusivity with a client, is worth it’s weight in gold, as it gives the agency the luxury of time to really match the best candidates to every role, and to deliver all the KPI’s, without being pulled into the ‘bun fight’ of trying to speak to candidates about a job first before the other agencies get to them.

 

  • Candidate loyalty only comes from delivering outstanding service. If people are registered with too many recruitment agencies, it is actually much more difficult to find them a job.

 

  • Not all agencies are ethical and professional, and some still work on a volume principle, sending far too many CV’s out for a vacancy, rather than only selecting candidate’s who really fit the brief.

 

  • We’re all fishing from the same candidate pool, and only the most skilled and experienced recruitment consultants know which bait to use to attract the most suitable, highest calibre people.

 

  • The world of recruitment is full of highs and lows. Nothing beats the feeling of placing a candidate in their perfect job. Equally, nothing matches the heart sink feeling when your super prepped candidate gets down to the last two, and gets beaten by a whisker.

 

  • It is extremely hard work, energy draining and soul destroying at times. It is also the most fulfilling, satisfying, people focused job I’ve ever done.

 

  • The role of the recruitment consultant is the ultimate selling role. You need to sell to clients to win the business in the first place, sell the job and the company culture to candidates and to sell candidates’ to hiring managers to encourage them to shortlist your people.

 

  • The term KAM is overused, and means so many different things to different companies and different people.

 

  • The pharmaceutical market place is very still unstable. Candidates seem to have very high expectations about their employability, and so a key part of the recruitment consultant’s job is to manage expectations and to really explore motivation in a very competitive environment.

 

  • As more and more companies choose to install electronic CV logging systems, it becomes increasingly difficult to ‘sell’ the candidates into hiring managers. Therefore, it is even more critical for a candidate’s CV to be absolutely outstanding, to differentiate them from the rest of the crowd, and to be as clear and as achievement focused as it can possibly be.

 

So, one year ends and another is just around the corner. I have learned a huge amount over the last 12 months, both about my job as a Recruitment Consultant, and also about myself, my own motivation and what makes me smile. I’d forgotten the buzz that is to be had from working in the toughest sales arenas, and I’d forgotten just how much I still want to win and to succeed. Every day is different, every day is action packed, and every day I live on my wits, and I’m ready to deal with anything that comes my way. I’m looking forward to the Christmas break, but I’m also optimistic and hopeful that 2011 will be a very fruitful year for 20:20 Selection Limited and for our selected candidates.

by Sam Harrison

Nurse Advisor and similar roles within the Pharmaceutical Industry

July 20, 2009

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