Posts Tagged ‘hospital’

GP/Hospital Representative – North West England – Superb Opportunity…Hurry As This Will Go Quickly!

February 2, 2012

We are seeking an experienced Medical Sales Representative (GP/Hospital) to cover the Lancashire and Cumbria territory working for a global leader in healthcare.

This is an opportunity for you to take control of your business results; the successful person will be charged with maximising sales across this territory for a portfolio of prescription products selling to General Practitioners, Hospital Customers, other relevant HCP’s and retail pharmacies throughout the territory.

To be considered for this position you will have the following skills/abilities:
– Commercial background and a good understanding of Key Account Management
– Strong team working will be important as you will have to work effectively with your customers and NHS Liaison Managers
– Preferably educated to degree level or equivalent.
– Proven track record of sales success
– Strong commercial awareness coupled with an in depth understanding of the key stakeholders within the NHS
– Flexibility and adaptability to operate in dynamic working environment
– Be accountable for own work load/decision making and actions
– Results orientated (set personal goals)
– Impact, enthusiasm and self motivated coupled with drive and determination to succeed

In return for your skills and contacts this organisation will offer the successful person a comprehensive salary & benefits package (basic salary is commensurate with experience) plus ongoing development throughout their career. Want to know more? Call us now on 0845 026 2020 or submit your CV here. This opportunity does have the potential to move quickly.

20:20 Selection Ltd promises to treat your application as important and will review your profile against our client’s requirements. However, if you have not heard from us within 7 days please assume that on this occasion you have not been successful. There are many more opportunities like this one advertised on our website daily……all our jobs are live
Visit to learn more……it’s free

New Role Just In – Hospital Sales Specialist ( NE, Yorks, East Mids)

January 31, 2012

Hospital Sales Specialist – Basic to £45k, OTE £60k++

Many more live vacancies can be viewed at

An opportunity to develop your talents working for a leading global Healthcare Company. Our client is currently looking for a Sales Specialist to develop the business in key hospital accounts throughout the North East,YorkshireandEast Midlands. Although a large geographical area this is a focused and targeted role with an emphasis on key account management.

This organisation has built an enviable portfolio of products and services that push back the frontiers of medical care and ultimately ensuring a better quality of life for people everywhere.

This opportunity for a Sales Specialist is an integral part of a specialty sales team reporting to the National Sales & Marketing Manager. You would be fully supported by internal functions such as marketing, customer services, logistics and shared services; YOU would be the interface of the company and the customer. With a drive for increased Patient Safety, in the NHS, when administering medication, our client is an excellent position to develop partnerships in hospital trusts. This role will involve selling new  as well as some established products and services.

Key responsibilities would include:

– Developing and implementing appropriate strategies for agreed customer targets with the objective of driving sales results and achieving or exceeding budgets.

– To identify key finance and clinical decision makers within Consortia, Hospitals and Units and arrange meetings to promote relevant products and services

– Gathering intelligence on customer plans and purchasing intentions and recommend responsive, timely and appropriate action.

– Maintaining a high level of knowledge of the therapy area and related products

– In conjunction with the National Sales Manager and wider commercial management team, provide informed input into/manage the tender process.

– Calling on key customers as per your business plan (Clinical/Aspectic/Purchasing Pharmacists, Procurement, Clinicians, Specialist Nurses)

To be considering for this exciting opportunity you are likely to have

– Previous hospital sales experience (2 years)

– Knowledge/Experience of NHS structure & buying processes

– Life sciences degree, nursing qualification, business degree (or equivalent experience inUKhealthcare market for minimum of 2 years)

– ABPI qualification and/or willing to study if required.

In return for your expertise if successful you will be offered a competitive salary & excellent benefits package including an uncapped bonus scheme. You will also receive first rate training and ongoing development.

To discuss this role in more detail please contact us on 0845 026 2020 or alternatively please submit your details by emailing

20:20Selection Ltd promises to treat your application as important and will review your profile against our client’s requirements. However, if you have not heard from us within 7 days please assume that on this occasion you have not been successful.


May 19, 2011

A medication ending with the stem ‘mab’ indicates that it is a monoclonal antibody. This is the internationally recognised nomenclature for the naming of monoclonal antibodies. 

Nomenclature has become somewhat confusing though as the BNF includes ‘mabs’ under the heading of cytokine modulators and anti-lymphocyte monoclonal antibodies in several chapters.

 Monoclonal antibody production for medical use was first discovered by Milstein and Kohler in 1975, but it was confined mainly to diagnostics until Vilcek and Li approached Centacor (now part of Johnson & Johnson) to help them produce ‘mabs’ against TNFα.

Tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα) is a cytokine (an immunomodulating agent) produced by monocytes and macrophages, two types of white blood cells. It mediates the immune response by increasing the transport of white blood cells to sites of inflammation, and through additional molecular mechanisms which initiate and amplify inflammation. Inhibition of its action by ‘mabs’ reduces the inflammatory response which is especially useful for treating autoimmune diseases.

The ‘mab’ that Vilcek and Li discovered become known as Infliximab (Remicade) and it became an important treatment for severe Crohn’s disease, including the fistulating variety. It has subsequently been used to treat other auto-immune system  diseases such as psoriasis and rheumatoid arthritis. Infliximab became known as ‘Kwik Fiximab’ in medical circles due to it’s clinical success in treating otherwise unresposive patients.

There are two types of TNF receptors: those found embedded in white blood cells that respond to TNF by releasing other cytokines, and soluble TNF receptors which are used to deactivate TNF and blunt the immune response. In addition, TNF receptors are found on the surface of virtually all nucleated cells. Red blood cells, which are not nucleated, do not contain TNF receptors on their surface.

A ‘mab’ neutralises the biological activity of TNFα by binding with high affinity to the soluble (free floating in the blood) and transmembrane (located on the outer membranes of T cells and similar immune cells) forms of TNFα and inhibits or prevents the effective binding of TNFα with its receptors. Infliximab and adalimumab (another TNF antagonist) are in the subclass of “anti-TNF antibodies” (they are in the form of naturally occurring antibodies), and are capable of neutralising all forms (extracellular, transmembrane, and receptor-bound) of TNFα. Etanercept, a third TNF antagonist, is not a ’mab’ and it is in a different subclass (receptor-construct fusion protein), and, because of its modified form, cannot neutralize receptor-bound TNFα. Etanercept is sometimes referred to as a ‘non-biologial’ agent to distinguish it further from the ‘mabs’ Additionally, the anti-TNF antibodies adalimumab and infliximab have the capability of lysing cells involved in the inflammatory process, whereas the receptor fusion protein apparently lacks this capability. Although the clinical significance of these differences have not been absolutely proven, they may account for the differential actions of these drugs in both efficacy and side effects.

Infliximab has high specificity for TNFα, and does not neutralise TNF beta (TNFβ, also called lymphotoxin α), an unrelated cytokine that uses different receptors from TNFα. Biological activities that are attributed to TNFα include: induction of proinflammatory cytokines such as interleukin (IL) 1 and IL 6, enhancement of leukocyte movement or migration from the blood vessels into the tissues by increasing the permeability of endothelial layer of blood vessels; and increasing the release of adhesion molecules.

A range of newer agents which act against these other cytokines have subsequently been developed.

Tha table below summarises the anti- TNF mabs available in the UK currently. None-mab anti-TNF agents are also included for comparison

Adalimumab Humira (Abbott) Anti-TNFα Recombinant human ‘mab’

From hamster ovary













Alemtuzumab MabCampath (Genzyme) Anti-lymphocyte Recombinant human ‘mab’ from hamster ovary CLL Yes
Certolizumab Pegol Cimzia (UCB Pharma) Anti-TNFα Recombinant human ‘mab’

From E Coli

RA Yes
Golimumab Simponi (Schering-Plough) Anti-TNFα Recombinant human ‘mab’ from murine cell line RA






Infliximab Remicade (Schering-Plough) Anti-TNFα Recombinant human ‘mab’ RA












Ofatumumab Arzerra (GSK) Anti-lymphocyte Recombinant human ‘mab’ from murine cell line CLL No
Rituximab MabThera (Roche) Anti-TNFα Recombinant human ‘mab’ from hamster ovary RA






Tocilizumab RoActemra (Roche) Anti-IL-6 Recombinant human ‘mab’ from hamster ovary RA Yes
Ustekinumab Stelara (Janssen-Cilag) Anti-IL-12/23 Recombinant human ‘mab’ from murine cell line P Yes
Abatacept Orencia (Bristol-Myers Squibb) T-cell modulator Fused protein formed by recombinantDNAtechnology RA




Anakinra Kineret (Swedish Orphan) Anti-IL-1 Recombinant human ‘mab’

From E Coli

Etanercept Enbrel (Wyeth) Anti-TNFα

(soluble receptor specific)

Fused protein formed by recombinantDNAtechnology from hamster ovary RA












RA = Rheumatoid arthritis

PJIA = Polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis

PA = Psoriatic arthritis

AS = Ankylosing spondylitis

CD = Crohn’s disease

P = Psoriasis

CLL= Chronic lymphocytic leukaemia

NHL= Non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma

NICEapproval status correct as of May 2011. Please refer to NICEwebsite for latest guidance

Sources:NICE, manufacturers Summaries of Product Characteristics, and BNF vol 61


October 21, 2010



The QIPP agenda is undoubtedly one of the most significant NHS policies that all organisations who conduct business with the NHS will have to take onboard.





The agenda will have to run through the every thought and every process that takes place throughout the NHS from Primary Care Trusts to Secondary Care to General Practice.

QIPP will affect every department and individual who works for the NHS – for example front line clinicians, PCT commissioners, estate managers, laundry services, ward staff, ambulance trusts, etc.


The year 2010/11 is the last year in which the £102 billion that is spent on the NHS is set to get an increase in funding of around 5.5%. For the foreseeable future the growth will be limited to inflation. The NHS needs to identify £15-£20 billion of efficiency savings by the end of 2013/14 that can be reinvested within the service so that it can continue to deliver year on year quality improvements.



In order to do business with the NHS in future, organisations will need to focus on how the products/services that they offer fit in with the local QIPP agenda. Clearly organisations will have to attain immediate overviews as to how the QIPP agenda is going to be adopted at local levels, as it is anticipated that new, complex information resources will be required to deliver tailored solutions for each NHS customer.

PCTs will be looking to move services into primary care to reduce cost and improve Quality and Productivity. Pharmaceutical companies are already working on how to utilise their existing knowledge of World Class Commissioning to drive their targeting and market access strategies – so the platform may already be there, but the message will need refining for the QIPP.

Specifically, some of the areas which the pharmaceutical industry might be concentrating on refining their messages and strategies could include:

  • to reduce preventable hospital admissions resulting from sub-optimal medicines use in chronic medical conditions (e.g. COPD)
  • to identify patients who are currently undiagnosed or misdiagnosed as having a treatable chronic medical condition (e.g. COPD, diabetes, cardiovascular disease)
  • to improve medical adherence and thereby improve health outcomes and reduce waste by reducing levels of non-adherence to medicines (e.g. community pharmacy monitoring schemes, GP staff training)
  • to improve adherence to NICE guidance (e.g. hypertension, DVT prevention)



There have already been some significant improvements made to Quality and Productivity and Department of Health has provided some recommended examples.

Opportunistic screening by pulse palpation of patients over 65 has been used in 18 regions to improve detection of atrial fibrillation. Quality is improved by the optimal treatment of patients with atrial fibrillation reducing risk of stroke. Productivity is increased by the reduction in costs associated with stroke and its complications.

Ten pilot trusts have succesfully implemented service re-design for the Fractured Neck Femur patient pathway. This improved quality by: improving multi discplinary and cross agency teamworking, reducing mortality, and time to theatre, and earlier mobilisation. Productivity was improved by reduced length of stay, readmissions, and delays to the theatre.

The NHS Institute supported Chief Executives and senior leadership to champion change and improvement across NHS organisations in all areas of the stroke pathway. Quality was improved by reducing mortality, time in A&E, and delay in CT scanning. Productivity was increased through reduction in length of stay and readmission.

The NHS Institute has supported ward leaders and nursing teams with innovative methods to improve the ward environment and process. Over 60% of NHS Acute Trusts are implementing the Productive Ward programme. Key improvements from the programme include improved quality through increasing direct patient care time and staff satisfaction and improved productivity through reduced staff absence and reduced length of hospital stay.

Oxford Radcliffe Hospitals have successfully implemented an electronic blood transfusion system. This has improved quality by reducing transfusion errors and the time taken to deliver blood. Productivity has improved by reduced blood usage, wastage, and staff time.

Enhanced recovery programmes use evidence based interventions to improve pre-, intra-, and postoperative care. They have enabled early recovery, discharge from hospital, and more rapid return to normal activities. Quality is increased by reducing complications and enabling a more rapid return to function. Productivity is improved by reducing hospital stay.

To improve the uptake of QIPP by clinicians the Department of Health has published a guide entitled:  The NHS Quality, Innovation, Productivity and Prevention Challenge: an introduction for clinicians

Further information on QIPP can be found at:


Pharmaceutical Sales – A spark of interest

April 23, 2010

Having embarked on a career as a medical representative in 1987, I still reflect on the route that led me to the pharmaceutical industry.  Being a Pharmaceutical Sales Representative doesn’t often appear in the list of careers that we aspire to as teenagers hence it is invariably something people come across coincidently.  For me I spent five years in a hospital Biochemistry Dept completing post graduate studies and developing a strong clinical understanding of various diseases and illnesses.  It was here I met Sales Representatives selling laboratory diagnostics and equipment which sparked an interest in sales (I have to admit to being initially impressed by the suit, car and perceived flexibility of their job).  In fact what did appeal to me about a sales role was the inherent challenges working towards targets and ultimately being rewarded (bonus) and recognised for exceeding goals (working in the NHS could not fulfil that need) as well as selling products which genuinely make a difference to people’s lives.

Hence I started buying the New Scientist and Daily Telegraph; there was no internet job searching in those days! Quite quickly I secured two interviews for Laboratory Territory Manager positions before seeing an advertisement for Trainee Medical Representatives with a major pharmaceutical company.

Have to confess at that stage that pharmaceuticals was a bit of a mystery to me, but my Dad said that company was great (blue-chip), and there was a number to call to apply.  Two interviews later, including being flown to head office, I was offered a GP/Hospital Representative position.

Looking back I do wonder how I got that job as these days we expect entry level candidates to know so much more about the day to day practicalities of the role, the NHS and how the business works.  Clearly the company were looking for the basic ingredients which they could then train, develop and mould to reflect their values and culture in the eyes of their customers;  GP, Nurses, Pharmacists, Consultants, Registrars, SHO etc.

Over twenty years later in a different NHS landscape I still believe this to be true so what are some of those basics;

Personal Qualities – An inner drive, self-starter, the ability to work on your own initiative, enthusiasm, can-do attitude, tenacity, the ability to problem solve, good interpersonal skills, the willingness as well as aptitude to learn.

Clinical Foundation – This means an interest in medicine, the ability to learn and apply technical information.  You will need to communicate this knowledge to customers of all levels.  ‘A’ level standard Biology should help with ABPI. 

Business & Selling Skills – Understand you are there to increase sales; it is a sales job & not a promotional or educational position.  Have a consultative selling style, i.e. probe to understand the customer needs and agenda before offering solutions. Key Account Management & Networking Skills. Understanding local NHS politics, targets, agenda and how these may impact on your business.

Clearly a lot of clinical and business skills can be taught as long as you have the right positive attitude. In summary I would describe the role of a Medical Sales Representative, whether that be GP, GP/Hospital, Hospital or Generics as the opportunity to run your own local business.

I have enjoyed a varied, challenging and satisfying career in the pharmaceutical industry. I also know others, who embarked on their career at the same time, who have had similar experiences and taken their careers in to different functions in the industry including: Marketing, Senior Sales Management, Training, Consultancy as well as others who are now Senior Representatives such as Hospital Specialist Representative or Healthcare Development Manager.

If this sparks an interest in you fantastic!  To discuss your background and transferable skills then contact 20:20 Selection Ltd on 0845 026 2020 or visit . We have current opportunities Nationwide with hot-spots in London, Kent, Sussex, Essex, Somerset, Wiltshire, East Anglia.

The New Year brings a new addition to the Recruitment Team at 20:20 Selection Ltd.

January 25, 2010

                                                            PRESS RELEASE

The New Year brings a new addition to the Recruitment Team at 20:20 Selection Ltd.

In the summer of 2008, Samantha Harrison, was the proud winner of the prestigious Pharma Times Senior RBM of the Year Award. At the start of 2010, she has begun the New Year with an exciting new challenge, by proudly joining the 20:20 Selection team as their new Recruitment Consultant.

Sam joined the pharmaceutical industry over 20 years ago as a Medical Sales Representative, and since then, she has worked in a wide variety of roles in her career, in both pharmaceuticals and in the CSO marketplace. Sam has extremely wide experience to bring to 20:20 Selection, having been an Oncology Hospital Specialist, a Field Trainer, a Regional Business Manager, Management Trainer, National Sales Manager, Operations Manager and most recently, as a Project Director at Innovex (UK) Ltd, managing multiple vacancy management teams for major clients in the pharmaceutical and healthcare industries.

Karen says, “Sam has built numerous teams for pharmaceutical companies in her time at both Innovex and Ashfield, so she has a great deal of experience and expertise in the field of recruitment. Sam understands exactly what kind of candidates our clients need, in order for them to compete in an increasingly demanding market. I know from first hand experience of working with her in the past, that she has the skill set to do a great job, and also a superb attitude that will help her to fit in perfectly at 20:20 Selection. She is talented, professional and extremely hard working. Those factors are crucial in recruitment.”

Sam has always kept an eye on the successful growth of 20:20 Selection since Karen Forshaw, 20:20’s Director, started the company. Sam and Karen have known each other for a long time, as they were colleagues together at Roche Pharmaceuticals, back in the mid 1990’s. Formed in 2002, 20:20 Selection Ltd has built a reputation for providing unrivalled recruitment services in terms of its commitment and dedication to both candidates and clients. “The reputation for quality that Karen and the team have developed within the market place is the main reason that I was so keen to come on board”, explains Sam. “I am delighted to be part of the team at 20:20 Selection”.

Nurse Advisor and similar roles within the Pharmaceutical Industry

July 20, 2009