Posts Tagged ‘career’

GP/Hospital Representative – North West England – Superb Opportunity…Hurry As This Will Go Quickly!

February 2, 2012

We are seeking an experienced Medical Sales Representative (GP/Hospital) to cover the Lancashire and Cumbria territory working for a global leader in healthcare.

This is an opportunity for you to take control of your business results; the successful person will be charged with maximising sales across this territory for a portfolio of prescription products selling to General Practitioners, Hospital Customers, other relevant HCP’s and retail pharmacies throughout the territory.

To be considered for this position you will have the following skills/abilities:
– Commercial background and a good understanding of Key Account Management
– Strong team working will be important as you will have to work effectively with your customers and NHS Liaison Managers
– Preferably educated to degree level or equivalent.
– Proven track record of sales success
– Strong commercial awareness coupled with an in depth understanding of the key stakeholders within the NHS
– Flexibility and adaptability to operate in dynamic working environment
– Be accountable for own work load/decision making and actions
– Results orientated (set personal goals)
– Impact, enthusiasm and self motivated coupled with drive and determination to succeed

In return for your skills and contacts this organisation will offer the successful person a comprehensive salary & benefits package (basic salary is commensurate with experience) plus ongoing development throughout their career. Want to know more? Call us now on 0845 026 2020 or submit your CV here. This opportunity does have the potential to move quickly.

20:20 Selection Ltd promises to treat your application as important and will review your profile against our client’s requirements. However, if you have not heard from us within 7 days please assume that on this occasion you have not been successful. There are many more opportunities like this one advertised on our website daily……all our jobs are live
Visit http://www.2020selection.co.uk/ to learn more……it’s free

New Role Just In – Hospital Sales Specialist ( NE, Yorks, East Mids)

January 31, 2012

Hospital Sales Specialist – Basic to £45k, OTE £60k++

Many more live vacancies can be viewed at http://www.2020selection.co.uk

An opportunity to develop your talents working for a leading global Healthcare Company. Our client is currently looking for a Sales Specialist to develop the business in key hospital accounts throughout the North East,YorkshireandEast Midlands. Although a large geographical area this is a focused and targeted role with an emphasis on key account management.

This organisation has built an enviable portfolio of products and services that push back the frontiers of medical care and ultimately ensuring a better quality of life for people everywhere.

This opportunity for a Sales Specialist is an integral part of a specialty sales team reporting to the National Sales & Marketing Manager. You would be fully supported by internal functions such as marketing, customer services, logistics and shared services; YOU would be the interface of the company and the customer. With a drive for increased Patient Safety, in the NHS, when administering medication, our client is an excellent position to develop partnerships in hospital trusts. This role will involve selling new  as well as some established products and services.

Key responsibilities would include:

– Developing and implementing appropriate strategies for agreed customer targets with the objective of driving sales results and achieving or exceeding budgets.

– To identify key finance and clinical decision makers within Consortia, Hospitals and Units and arrange meetings to promote relevant products and services

– Gathering intelligence on customer plans and purchasing intentions and recommend responsive, timely and appropriate action.

– Maintaining a high level of knowledge of the therapy area and related products

– In conjunction with the National Sales Manager and wider commercial management team, provide informed input into/manage the tender process.

– Calling on key customers as per your business plan (Clinical/Aspectic/Purchasing Pharmacists, Procurement, Clinicians, Specialist Nurses)

To be considering for this exciting opportunity you are likely to have

– Previous hospital sales experience (2 years)

– Knowledge/Experience of NHS structure & buying processes

– Life sciences degree, nursing qualification, business degree (or equivalent experience inUKhealthcare market for minimum of 2 years)

– ABPI qualification and/or willing to study if required.

In return for your expertise if successful you will be offered a competitive salary & excellent benefits package including an uncapped bonus scheme. You will also receive first rate training and ongoing development.

To discuss this role in more detail please contact us on 0845 026 2020 or alternatively please submit your details by emailing administrator@2020selection.co.uk

20:20Selection Ltd promises to treat your application as important and will review your profile against our client’s requirements. However, if you have not heard from us within 7 days please assume that on this occasion you have not been successful.

Are you eligible? Having your documents ready for your job search.

July 7, 2011

Embarking on a search for a new job can be daunting however like all things in life it can go more smoothly with forward planning. This short article is aimed at ensuring you have the relevant factual information at hand. This is important as agencies (like20:20 Selection Ltd) and importantly employers do need to check your legal, employment and academic documentation. Hence if you have all this in order, then when it comes to you being made that perfect job offer the contract/job offer letter is likely to be with you more quickly.

 

The following checklist should help you with your preparation:

  • Passport & Visa (if applicable) – an employer can be fined for employing individuals who are not eligible to work in theUK
  • Driving Licence – you will need the paper and photo card parts. For field based positions you will need a validUKdriving licence with no more than 6 penalty points. It is important you make clear declarations about your driving history when asked as employers will check this with the DVLA.

If you have a nonUKlicence holder and need to convert your licence the following link will give you some guidance:

http://www.direct.gov.uk/en/Motoring/DriverLicensing/DrivingInGbOnAForeignLicence/DG_4022562

  • A recent payslip. This will validated your current basic salary and your National Insurance number. If you are in receipt of other monthly benefits such as a car allowance this will also be verified on the payslip.
  • ABPI certificate – if you have sat and passed the examination you will need to produce your certificate if you are offered employment with a pharmaceutical company. If you have misplaced this, the following link may help

https://extranet.abpi.org.uk/web/abpi/exams.nsf/pages/duplicate_certificate_request

  • Highest education certificates (degree, nursing, A levels etc)
  • For nursing roles you will need your current NMC PIN number and date of expiry. Plus you will also be asked about the date of your last CRB check however your new employer will need to undertake a fresh check.
  • For sales positions you should also put together your ‘Brag File’ or portfolio of successes which should include Sales Data, other performance against KPIs, recent appraisal documents; in fact anything that you can use to sell you and differentiate you in the marketplace.

 

If you are not facing redundancy, timing your job search is also something to consider. For example,

  • We do come across people who may be tied in to car schemes. You are advised to carefully calculate the costs involved to you in walking away from your current agreement, as not all employers offer car opt-out schemes.
  • If you are going to jeopardise any bonus/incentive payments pay by leaving before a certain date.
  • If you have significant holiday commitments it is important you flag these. A job offer may be subject to you attending a training course on a specific date for a fixed time, however discussing these with your Recruitment Consultant early in the process may mean this can be negotiated. Also remember that holiday entitlement will be prorated depending at what stage of the leave year you commence work.

 

At 20:20Selection, we are here to help and guide our candidate along the process. Our specialist team can be contacted on 0845 026 2020 from08:30 – 18:00weekdays.

MABS / CYTOKINE MODULATORS / ANIT- TNF AGENTS AND MORE

May 19, 2011

A medication ending with the stem ‘mab’ indicates that it is a monoclonal antibody. This is the internationally recognised nomenclature for the naming of monoclonal antibodies. 

Nomenclature has become somewhat confusing though as the BNF includes ‘mabs’ under the heading of cytokine modulators and anti-lymphocyte monoclonal antibodies in several chapters.

 Monoclonal antibody production for medical use was first discovered by Milstein and Kohler in 1975, but it was confined mainly to diagnostics until Vilcek and Li approached Centacor (now part of Johnson & Johnson) to help them produce ‘mabs’ against TNFα.

Tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα) is a cytokine (an immunomodulating agent) produced by monocytes and macrophages, two types of white blood cells. It mediates the immune response by increasing the transport of white blood cells to sites of inflammation, and through additional molecular mechanisms which initiate and amplify inflammation. Inhibition of its action by ‘mabs’ reduces the inflammatory response which is especially useful for treating autoimmune diseases.

The ‘mab’ that Vilcek and Li discovered become known as Infliximab (Remicade) and it became an important treatment for severe Crohn’s disease, including the fistulating variety. It has subsequently been used to treat other auto-immune system  diseases such as psoriasis and rheumatoid arthritis. Infliximab became known as ‘Kwik Fiximab’ in medical circles due to it’s clinical success in treating otherwise unresposive patients.

There are two types of TNF receptors: those found embedded in white blood cells that respond to TNF by releasing other cytokines, and soluble TNF receptors which are used to deactivate TNF and blunt the immune response. In addition, TNF receptors are found on the surface of virtually all nucleated cells. Red blood cells, which are not nucleated, do not contain TNF receptors on their surface.

A ‘mab’ neutralises the biological activity of TNFα by binding with high affinity to the soluble (free floating in the blood) and transmembrane (located on the outer membranes of T cells and similar immune cells) forms of TNFα and inhibits or prevents the effective binding of TNFα with its receptors. Infliximab and adalimumab (another TNF antagonist) are in the subclass of “anti-TNF antibodies” (they are in the form of naturally occurring antibodies), and are capable of neutralising all forms (extracellular, transmembrane, and receptor-bound) of TNFα. Etanercept, a third TNF antagonist, is not a ’mab’ and it is in a different subclass (receptor-construct fusion protein), and, because of its modified form, cannot neutralize receptor-bound TNFα. Etanercept is sometimes referred to as a ‘non-biologial’ agent to distinguish it further from the ‘mabs’ Additionally, the anti-TNF antibodies adalimumab and infliximab have the capability of lysing cells involved in the inflammatory process, whereas the receptor fusion protein apparently lacks this capability. Although the clinical significance of these differences have not been absolutely proven, they may account for the differential actions of these drugs in both efficacy and side effects.

Infliximab has high specificity for TNFα, and does not neutralise TNF beta (TNFβ, also called lymphotoxin α), an unrelated cytokine that uses different receptors from TNFα. Biological activities that are attributed to TNFα include: induction of proinflammatory cytokines such as interleukin (IL) 1 and IL 6, enhancement of leukocyte movement or migration from the blood vessels into the tissues by increasing the permeability of endothelial layer of blood vessels; and increasing the release of adhesion molecules.

A range of newer agents which act against these other cytokines have subsequently been developed.

Tha table below summarises the anti- TNF mabs available in the UK currently. None-mab anti-TNF agents are also included for comparison

MOLECULE BRAND CLASS DERIVATION INDICATION NICEAPPROVED
Adalimumab Humira (Abbott) Anti-TNFα Recombinant human ‘mab’

From hamster ovary

RA

PJIA

PA

AS

CD

P

Yes

No

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Alemtuzumab MabCampath (Genzyme) Anti-lymphocyte Recombinant human ‘mab’ from hamster ovary CLL Yes
Certolizumab Pegol Cimzia (UCB Pharma) Anti-TNFα Recombinant human ‘mab’

From E Coli

RA Yes
Golimumab Simponi (Schering-Plough) Anti-TNFα Recombinant human ‘mab’ from murine cell line RA

PA

AS

No

No

No

Infliximab Remicade (Schering-Plough) Anti-TNFα Recombinant human ‘mab’ RA

CD

UC

AS

PA

P

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Ofatumumab Arzerra (GSK) Anti-lymphocyte Recombinant human ‘mab’ from murine cell line CLL No
Rituximab MabThera (Roche) Anti-TNFα Recombinant human ‘mab’ from hamster ovary RA

CLL

NHL

Yes

Yes

Yes

Tocilizumab RoActemra (Roche) Anti-IL-6 Recombinant human ‘mab’ from hamster ovary RA Yes
Ustekinumab Stelara (Janssen-Cilag) Anti-IL-12/23 Recombinant human ‘mab’ from murine cell line P Yes
           
Abatacept Orencia (Bristol-Myers Squibb) T-cell modulator Fused protein formed by recombinantDNAtechnology RA

PJIA

Yes

No

Anakinra Kineret (Swedish Orphan) Anti-IL-1 Recombinant human ‘mab’

From E Coli

RA No
Etanercept Enbrel (Wyeth) Anti-TNFα

(soluble receptor specific)

Fused protein formed by recombinantDNAtechnology from hamster ovary RA

PJIA

PA

AS

P

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

 

KEY

RA = Rheumatoid arthritis

PJIA = Polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis

PA = Psoriatic arthritis

AS = Ankylosing spondylitis

CD = Crohn’s disease

P = Psoriasis

CLL= Chronic lymphocytic leukaemia

NHL= Non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma

NICEapproval status correct as of May 2011. Please refer to NICEwebsite for latest guidance http://www.nice.org.uk/

Sources:NICE, manufacturers Summaries of Product Characteristics, and BNF vol 61

VALUE BASED PRICING (VBP) – How the NHS will purchase drugs

February 15, 2011

 The government intends to reform the way in which drugs purchased by the NHS are priced by the end of 2013. It aims to ensure that drug costs more fully reflect clinical benefit and to improve patient access to new treatments. At present the prices are determined by the Pharmaceutical Price Regulatory Scheme (PPRS). These prices are usually reviewed at 5 yearly intervals. Pharmaceutical companies are relatively free to set the price of a newly launched product (assuming it is accepted for use by NICE, the Scottich Medicines Consortium or the All Wales Medicines Strategy Group in the first instance). The PPRS then reviews these prices so that the profits that are made from the sale of drugs to the NHS are not considered to be excessive.

The Office of Fair Trading argues that drug prices should reflect their clinical benefits and current policy wastes NHS resources. The pharmaceutical industry welcomes the concept of value-based pricing, but is concerned about the impact on profits which are needed to make research viable. The Office of Fair Trading (OFT) estimates that up to 25% of world pharmaceuticals sales reference UK prices to some extent. Companies are thus particularly sensitive about any agreement that reduces the UK list price of a drug as this can have a knock-on effect on the profits made on sales elsewhere in the world.

Successive price cuts and exchange rate movements mean that UK prices are currently amongst the lowest in Europe. This has led to parallel-exporting (the opposite of the practice of parallel-importing cheaper non-English language versions of the same branded product from the EEU to the UK) of UK branded medicines to the EEU, by wholesalers, pharmacies and NHS trusts for commercial gain which has led to severe shortages of many popularly prescribed medicines in the UK.

Under the new system of value-based pricing, the Government would apply weightings to the benefits provided by new branded medicines, which would imply a range of price thresholds reflecting the maximum they are prepared to pay for medicines. These thresholds or maximum prices would be adjusted to reflect a broader range of relevant factors that are not fully taken into account by the current sytem of using Quality Adjusted Life Years (QALYs) by NICE so they could be used to calculate the full value of a new product.

The Government proposes that the price threshold structure is determined as follows:

  • there would be a basic threshold, reflecting the benefits displaced elsewhere in the NHS when funds are allocated to new medicines
  • there would be higher thresholds for medicines that tackle diseases where there is greater “burden of illness”: the more the medicine is focused on diseases with unmet need or which are particularly severe, the higher the threshold
  • there would be higher thresholds for medicines that can demonstrate greater therapeutic innovation and improvements compared with other products
  •  there would be higher thresholds for medicines that can demonstrate wider societal benefits.

 

Designing the new system to be both stable and transparent would allow companies to predict well in advance how prospective products may fare, and to focus their research efforts on the treatments that society values most. Companies would be informed of these weightings – allowing them to orient their research and development investments appropriately. This may well draw to a close the ‘me too’ concept of launching ‘newer versions’ of drugs which treat similar conditions with little demonstrable benefit over the original.

Thus, a new product would be launched, then reviewed by the Government to access its impact on patient health and the others factors discussed above, and the price to the NHS adjusted accordingly over a period of time.

The work of NICE as a provider authoritative advice and information would continue, but the decision as to whether a new medicine will be used in clinical practice will ultimately be made by the clinicians themselves.

VBP models are already implemented in many European countries including Germany, Sweden, France, Spain and Italy.

What I Wish I’d known As A Hiring Manager……….

December 13, 2010

It’s been almost a year since I joined 20:20 Selection Ltd as a Recruitment Consultant; and as we approach the shortest day and start the wind down for Christmas, I feel that it’s a good time to reflect on what I’ve learned over the last twelve months.

Firstly, I’ve realised that in the world of recruitment there isn’t a wind down for Christmas at all! In fact, at 20:20 Selection Limited we are still flat out busy, working on new vacancies as well as existing ones, for our clients who want jobs offered and filled over the next two weeks, in time for ITC’s on 4th January. I had naively thought that we would be starting on the mince pies and sherry by now, but in fact I suspect that the Season’s merriments won’t begin until 4pm on Friday 24th December.

When I was a hiring manager, both as a Regional Business Manager, and as a National Manager, I thought I knew quite a bit about recruitment. I thought I knew how to spot an outstanding candidate from an average one. I thought I knew how to really dig down deep to get to know the ‘face behind the mask’, so that I could recruit the best of the best; the gem who would fit into the team quickly and would add value from day one.

What I’ve now realised, is just how little I actually knew about recruitment when I was a hiring manager.

If only I’d known that:

  • An awful lot of work goes on behind the scenes, long before a manager receives CV’s to review.

 

  • For every strong potential candidate, the best agencies reject another hundred CV’s from the ‘Average Joe’.

 

  • The recruitment industry is incredibly competitive, with most clients now choosing a multi agency Preferred Supplier List.

 

  • Achieving exclusivity with a client, is worth it’s weight in gold, as it gives the agency the luxury of time to really match the best candidates to every role, and to deliver all the KPI’s, without being pulled into the ‘bun fight’ of trying to speak to candidates about a job first before the other agencies get to them.

 

  • Candidate loyalty only comes from delivering outstanding service. If people are registered with too many recruitment agencies, it is actually much more difficult to find them a job.

 

  • Not all agencies are ethical and professional, and some still work on a volume principle, sending far too many CV’s out for a vacancy, rather than only selecting candidate’s who really fit the brief.

 

  • We’re all fishing from the same candidate pool, and only the most skilled and experienced recruitment consultants know which bait to use to attract the most suitable, highest calibre people.

 

  • The world of recruitment is full of highs and lows. Nothing beats the feeling of placing a candidate in their perfect job. Equally, nothing matches the heart sink feeling when your super prepped candidate gets down to the last two, and gets beaten by a whisker.

 

  • It is extremely hard work, energy draining and soul destroying at times. It is also the most fulfilling, satisfying, people focused job I’ve ever done.

 

  • The role of the recruitment consultant is the ultimate selling role. You need to sell to clients to win the business in the first place, sell the job and the company culture to candidates and to sell candidates’ to hiring managers to encourage them to shortlist your people.

 

  • The term KAM is overused, and means so many different things to different companies and different people.

 

  • The pharmaceutical market place is very still unstable. Candidates seem to have very high expectations about their employability, and so a key part of the recruitment consultant’s job is to manage expectations and to really explore motivation in a very competitive environment.

 

  • As more and more companies choose to install electronic CV logging systems, it becomes increasingly difficult to ‘sell’ the candidates into hiring managers. Therefore, it is even more critical for a candidate’s CV to be absolutely outstanding, to differentiate them from the rest of the crowd, and to be as clear and as achievement focused as it can possibly be.

 

So, one year ends and another is just around the corner. I have learned a huge amount over the last 12 months, both about my job as a Recruitment Consultant, and also about myself, my own motivation and what makes me smile. I’d forgotten the buzz that is to be had from working in the toughest sales arenas, and I’d forgotten just how much I still want to win and to succeed. Every day is different, every day is action packed, and every day I live on my wits, and I’m ready to deal with anything that comes my way. I’m looking forward to the Christmas break, but I’m also optimistic and hopeful that 2011 will be a very fruitful year for 20:20 Selection Limited and for our selected candidates.

by Sam Harrison

QIPP

October 21, 2010

FACTSHEET

WHAT IS QIPP?

The QIPP agenda is undoubtedly one of the most significant NHS policies that all organisations who conduct business with the NHS will have to take onboard.

Quality

Innovation

Productivity

Prevention

The agenda will have to run through the every thought and every process that takes place throughout the NHS from Primary Care Trusts to Secondary Care to General Practice.

QIPP will affect every department and individual who works for the NHS – for example front line clinicians, PCT commissioners, estate managers, laundry services, ward staff, ambulance trusts, etc.

Why?

The year 2010/11 is the last year in which the £102 billion that is spent on the NHS is set to get an increase in funding of around 5.5%. For the foreseeable future the growth will be limited to inflation. The NHS needs to identify £15-£20 billion of efficiency savings by the end of 2013/14 that can be reinvested within the service so that it can continue to deliver year on year quality improvements.

HOW WILL QIPP AFFECT PHARMA?

 

In order to do business with the NHS in future, organisations will need to focus on how the products/services that they offer fit in with the local QIPP agenda. Clearly organisations will have to attain immediate overviews as to how the QIPP agenda is going to be adopted at local levels, as it is anticipated that new, complex information resources will be required to deliver tailored solutions for each NHS customer.

PCTs will be looking to move services into primary care to reduce cost and improve Quality and Productivity. Pharmaceutical companies are already working on how to utilise their existing knowledge of World Class Commissioning to drive their targeting and market access strategies – so the platform may already be there, but the message will need refining for the QIPP.

Specifically, some of the areas which the pharmaceutical industry might be concentrating on refining their messages and strategies could include:

  • to reduce preventable hospital admissions resulting from sub-optimal medicines use in chronic medical conditions (e.g. COPD)
  • to identify patients who are currently undiagnosed or misdiagnosed as having a treatable chronic medical condition (e.g. COPD, diabetes, cardiovascular disease)
  • to improve medical adherence and thereby improve health outcomes and reduce waste by reducing levels of non-adherence to medicines (e.g. community pharmacy monitoring schemes, GP staff training)
  • to improve adherence to NICE guidance (e.g. hypertension, DVT prevention)

 

RECOMMENDED EXAMPLES

There have already been some significant improvements made to Quality and Productivity and Department of Health has provided some recommended examples.

Opportunistic screening by pulse palpation of patients over 65 has been used in 18 regions to improve detection of atrial fibrillation. Quality is improved by the optimal treatment of patients with atrial fibrillation reducing risk of stroke. Productivity is increased by the reduction in costs associated with stroke and its complications.

Ten pilot trusts have succesfully implemented service re-design for the Fractured Neck Femur patient pathway. This improved quality by: improving multi discplinary and cross agency teamworking, reducing mortality, and time to theatre, and earlier mobilisation. Productivity was improved by reduced length of stay, readmissions, and delays to the theatre.

The NHS Institute supported Chief Executives and senior leadership to champion change and improvement across NHS organisations in all areas of the stroke pathway. Quality was improved by reducing mortality, time in A&E, and delay in CT scanning. Productivity was increased through reduction in length of stay and readmission.

The NHS Institute has supported ward leaders and nursing teams with innovative methods to improve the ward environment and process. Over 60% of NHS Acute Trusts are implementing the Productive Ward programme. Key improvements from the programme include improved quality through increasing direct patient care time and staff satisfaction and improved productivity through reduced staff absence and reduced length of hospital stay.

Oxford Radcliffe Hospitals have successfully implemented an electronic blood transfusion system. This has improved quality by reducing transfusion errors and the time taken to deliver blood. Productivity has improved by reduced blood usage, wastage, and staff time.

Enhanced recovery programmes use evidence based interventions to improve pre-, intra-, and postoperative care. They have enabled early recovery, discharge from hospital, and more rapid return to normal activities. Quality is increased by reducing complications and enabling a more rapid return to function. Productivity is improved by reducing hospital stay.

To improve the uptake of QIPP by clinicians the Department of Health has published a guide entitled:  The NHS Quality, Innovation, Productivity and Prevention Challenge: an introduction for clinicians www.somaxa.com/docs/file/QIPP_2010.pdf

Further information on QIPP can be found at:

www.link-gov.org/content/view/463/188/

www.library.nhs.uk/qipp/

 

Exclusive to 20:20 Selection Ltd – Crucell Team expansion

August 24, 2010

In 2009, Crucell – the largest independent vaccines company in the world
– launched a dedicated Sales & Marketing function in the UK. Since the
establishment of its own dedicated sales team, Crucell has been able to focus
on expanding market share for its portfolio of travel and respiratory vaccines
in the UK. Recent changes to the reimbursement status of oral vaccines by the Department of Health mean that Crucell can now further expand this sales
team in England.
The expansion of the sales team is a reflection of the successful first year of
the UK Sales & Marketing function, and represents an excellent time to join
the team as they capitalise on their achievements to date. Crucell firmly believe that investing in their people is investing in the future, and is dedicated to developing employees’ competencies and promoting individual performance.
Brand new opportunities now exist for Territory and Regional Business
Managers to join the company throughout England and Wales.
These are senior sales roles where you will be responsible for the cash and
market share growth on your own territory. You will also play a major part
in developing Crucell’s reputation as a trusted partner in the provision of
vaccines to general practice. If you have previously sold vaccines, this may be an advantage: however, it is your attitude, drive, tenacity and enthusiasm that will be the key qualities you will need to succeed.
On offer to successful candidates will be a highly attractive basic salary,
company car or car allowance, excellent bonus potential, 25 days holiday,
pension & private healthcare. Crucell UK Ltd is a growing organisation with
full investment from their headquarters in Holland. This is a genuinely exciting opportunity for you to develop your career within a company that is dedicated to bringing meaningful innovation to global health.

Health White Paper

August 5, 2010
 

LANSLEY’S HEALTH REFORMS

Tuesday 13th July 2010

The new Health Minister announced the White Paper that lays out the future of the NHS over the course of this parliament (which is now a guaranteed 5 years).  He described this as a ‘blueprint’ for Health Policy up to the next General Election.  The main aim is to cut £20bn from the Health Budget over the next 4 years.  One of the main issues is the end of the current PCTs, which means that GPs will have direct control of the commissioning of services.  NHS Management costs are set to reduce by 45% as a part of this reduction.

This is considered by many to be the most radical NHS White Paper to date, and is expected to be well received by the Conservative back benches.  As for the Lib Dems, they had the abolition of StHAs as part of their 2010 manifesto, so this should sit well with them also.

Lansley said ‘the provision of healthcare service will be led by patients and professionals and not by politicians’.

The basics of the White Paper are set out below:

 More power to GPs

The most contentious issues will be the compulsory devolvement of huge commissioning powers to GP and GP Consortia and the abolition of Primary Care Trusts (PCTs). None of this was proposed by the Conservatives when they were in opposition.  These decisions emerged after the General Election. There is concern that a large number of GPs do not want to take on commissioning functions, and in fact are ill-equipped to do so.

It is interesting therefore to note that the British Medical Association has welcomed today’s announcement.

More power to patients

The Government is going to launch HealthWatch England, a new ‘consumer champion’, which will sit within the Care Quality Commission (CQC). The White Paper provides an ethos for structural change; the NHS must be patient led and choices must be led by those at the frontline of delivering those services to patients, i.e. clinicians. On a national level, it will be able to propose CQC investigations of poor service. This organisation will help to strengthen the patient voice and ensure that patient feedback is heard at a local level. Patients will not only have power over the choice of GP they would like to attend (regardless of where they live), but will also have power over who has sight of their patient record.

Abolition of Primary Care Trusts (PCTs)

The complete removal of PCTs, instead of simply reducing their numbers, came as a big surprise when compared to the proposals contained in the Conservative manifesto from January 2010. However, it is in keeping with current measures when you look at the plan to reduce admin costs by 45%.  Some form of supervisory role is of course required, particularly in respect of GPs and other primary care services, and it is a role which Monitor (the body currently responsible for the regulation of Foundation Trusts) may find challenging.   

Abolition of Strategic Health Authorities (SHAs)

SHAs will be abolished as early as  2012. Their functions will be taken over by Monitor. Monitors’ remit will extend to establish it as the key economic regulator in healthcare.

Foundation Trusts

All NHS Trusts will become or be part of a Foundation Trust and this will be the preferred governance model for the health service. Trusts will be given more freedom to innovate to improve patient care. NHS staff will have the opportunity – where appropriate – to manage these organisations as ‘the largest social enterprise sector in the world’.

NHS Commissioning Board

A review of existing quangos is due to report in the autumn but the White Paper makes provision for a number of new bodies which will help implement this new, patient led vision of the NHS. The most vital is the NHS Commissioning Board which will act to ensure quality in commissioning and be responsible for commissioning certain services, such as community pharmacy, which GPs cannot commission. It will also be responsible for increasing patient choice through helping patients manage their personal health budgets. The intention is for this body to be fully operational in April 2012. The underpinning concept is to reduce the number of quangos but those that do exist will be interlinked and more accessible to patients.

Value based pricing

The White Paper confirms that the Government intends to move to value based pricing when the current Pharmaceutical Price Regulation Scheme (PPRS) runs out at the end of 2013. A reference is made to the Cancer Drugs Fund, which will operate from April 2011, but no further details are provided.

NICE

In a further strengthening of its powers, NICE will be in charge of developing new quality standards for all the main pathways of care. The paper estimates that NICE will develop up to 150 new quality standards over the next five years. This will position NICE as the key quality regulator building on Lord Darzi’s work on quality improvements, under the previous Government.

 Scrapping targets

As mentioned in the NHS Operating Framework, targets with ‘no clinical justification’ will be scrapped (although not as many as were discussed in Opposition). There is a concession that some targets do work but the paper is not clear on which ones and a consultation is promised on new measureables.

Long Term Care

A Commission will be set up to look into long-term care from the Department of Health. This is in keeping with the move to strip away the Department’s NHS functions and replace them with longer term social care objectives.

Consultation

A number of consultation papers will be published in the near future, getting stakeholder views on policies including; commissioning for patients, freeing providers and economic regulation, the NHS outcomes framework, the framework for transition. This process will be an important part of the transition to the new system as will the proper management of the financial risk.

Legislation

Primary legislation will be required to make many of the proposed changes in the White Paper. The Health Bill announced in the Queen’s Speech provides for many of these reforms and is due to be introduced in late 2010. The main legislative reforms in the Bill will include: Making improvement in outcomes central to the NHS; Reforming NICE;  creating the independent NHS Commissioning Board; creating a framework for a comprehensive system of GP consortia; establishing HealthWatch; reforming the Foundation Trust model; developing Monitor’s role and reducing the number of arms length bodies in health. The Department of Health is taking comments on implementing all the changes in the Health Bill, which must be submitted by 5 October 2010. We can therefore deduce that the Health Bill will not be laid before Parliament before this date.  

The Health Bill will also support the creation of a new Public Health Service, which will streamline existing health improvement and protection bodies. Another White Paper, this time on public health will be published later this year. In addition, the public health budget will be ring-fenced and local Directors of Public Health will be responsible for health improvement funds allocated according to local need.

Sources: white paper and Mr Lansleys press release.