Posts Tagged ‘recruitment’

Trainee Recruitment Consultant – A Day In The Life Of Chris

January 26, 2012

Last week I started a training contract within an established Medical Sales recruitment company  As a virgin to the industry I prepared myself as best I could for what I was about to undertake. I did all my reading around the career area and the company itself and eventually it came down to taking the plunge and accepting a 2 week trial in a very unpredictable time period for a recruitment consultant, the 2 weeks preceding the Christmas break. This is obviously an odd time in the industry as our Clients will be in one of 2 camps, the 1st of which being the “lets get the most out of our budget spend before the end of the year before its taken away from us in January”, and the 2nd being, “I’ve done all I can this year, lets start again in 2012”.

My 1st day was, as expected, the birth by fire. This is how we operate, take in as much as you can and see if you can keep up. This gave me a great insight into the speed, efficiency, and accuracy required from a consultant. If you’re not 1st, you’re last. This ethos opens up possibilities for huge success but at the same time great falls. After all we are competing against several other companies with differing approaches to achieving the same goal, luckily for me I’m working on the basis of quality rather than quantity. But that doesn’t mean quantity doesn’t get it right some times.

The harsh reality of the other side of recruitment fast became apparent. You really have to shine to get noticed in the current climate and the vast array of approaches that candidates use to attain this is eye opening. The role itself is very diverse. Admin is air tight, and has to be. It can be the difference between placing and missing out, a point regularly re-enforced during my training thus far. Combine admin with confident selective telephone manner, excellent knowledge of your clients and candidates, and the foresight to combine the two and you may have what it takes to take on the world of recruitment.

The industry requires you to effectively sit on a knife edge, the whole game is in balance, continually changing as both clients and candidates change their ‘requirements’, which can either push you right to the top or plunge you back to square one. This makes for a very exciting work environment as we are challenged with the task of keeping the balance in our favour right until the very last minute and then if all goes to plan, we can tip the scales and reap the benefit.

The team currently have the task of not only managing business but also managing me. As a fresh starter I am as keen and eager as you’d expect. I want to get my hands dirty and dive straight in but my lack of experience leaves me blind to the consequence. I am effectively stood on top of a diving board blindfold, trusting my team for direction and timing so I land on soft success rather than the hard ground of misconception. Time will tell……

Which Recruitment Agency?

January 18, 2012

Despite the global recession and credit crunch, one of the UK’s leading pharmaceutical recruitment agencies , 20:20 Selection Ltd has gone from strength to strength. How have they acheived their organic growth in these difficult times?

The team have over 50 years of combined, actual experience in the pharmaceutical and healthcare sales arenas in the UK.

Managing Director Karen Forshaw formed the company in 2002, after a successful career in medical sales (both primary and secondary care) and medical sales management (at both area and national sales manager level). She is passionate about providing an unirivaled service to both clients and candidates. The 20:20 Selection maxim of “perfect vision: not hindsight” extols the company virtues down to a tee. By carefully selecting their  candidates, 20:20 Selection ensure that when one goes before a client for an interview then they have an excellent chance of actually getting hired.

Using the experience and advice from Karen’s team, 20:20 Selection will ensure that you are only ever put forward for roles which you really understand and want to do. They only send your CV to clients with your full permission. Should you get an interview, then Karen and the team will keep you fully briefed and ‘prepped’ during the entire process. They have an enviable reputation within the industry as a recruitment company that really cares about both clients and candidates. One of the prime motivating factors is that individual consultants are not bonussed on just their own performance, but on the performance of the whole company. As a result you will not find yourself being forced or coerced into going for a role just to make up the sales figures of the consultant that you are dealing with.

So if you are interested in a role in UK pharmaceutical, medical or device sales then please contact us at administrator@2020selection.co.uk or visit our website http://www.2020selection.co.uk to find out more about the company.

Please note that in order to reach our minimum standards you will need to be qualified to work in the UK, have a full UK driving licence with not more than 6 points and be educated to degree level or be of graduate calibre.

Good Luck in your career.

Redundancy: How to make this an opportunity

July 22, 2011

 

Redundancy in the pharmaceutical industry has been a recurring theme in recent years. Yes the current global economic crisis has compounded matters but the affects we are seeing are more driven by the changing NHS, market access challenges, product pipelines and the drive for profitability.

So what do you need to do if you are told you are ‘on consultation’ or are actually redundant? Firstly do not panic. Then try not to take the news as personal, remember it is the job that is redundant, even if you feel unhappy about selection criteria for redundancy your HR Department will be ensuring that the process is fair and lawful.

It is normal to go through a whole raft of emotions which may include anger, relief, frustration, even sadness. The difficult aspects are often related to the fact that one day you had an interesting, respectable, well paid job with company car to suddenly being unemployed. Once you have digested this, and dealt with any immediate personal or financial implications, then please be positive so you use the situation as the opportunity it is to review your career goals and aspirations.

We know there are fewer jobs in medical/pharmaceutical sales than in the boom of 1995 – 2005 but the positive news is that roles are evolving, becoming more account management focused and often more specialist in nature presenting superb opportunities for strong sales professional to further develop their skills. It is fair to say that some people may see redundancy as a chance to move out of the sector, we are well trained by pharmaceutical companies and your transferable skills are marketable if you decide to explore that route.

Based on our experience there are some key tips which will be crucial in securing the right next position; you don’t want to jump in to a job if it’s not right. We do see too many people coming in six months post redundancy saying “I took my current job as I was redundant but realise now I took it because it was a job”; this doesn’t look good on a CV.

  1. Ensure you have all the data/evidence you need to sell yourself at your next interview. Too many candidates claim the information has been lost or still on the company PC which has now gone back. If you are competing against someone else with a good Brag File you could miss out on that perfect job. Find all your sales data, business plans, appraisals, field visit report, examples of additional projects, formulary letters etc
  2. Refer to this information when you are updating your CV; you need to have your CV as achievement focused as possible, these should be specific. Contact us (20:20Selection Ltd) for advice
  3. Find an agency that understands the industry and how best to sell your skills
  4. Do not log your CV as open access on recruitment websites as you need to retain control of your personal information
  5. Do keep a log of where you have sent your CV and track progress of your applications.
  6. Consider how a Recruitment Consultant can help you prepare for interviews i.e. interview practice, presentations, attending assessment centres or just a sounding board
  7. Be open to roles and companies you may not have heard of; there some interesting positions available.
  8. Ensure you attend interviews you have committed to as it is a very small world.
  9. Before an interview ensure you fully research the company and therapy area/products; the manager will expect you have done this as well as expect you can sell yourself for her/his specific position
  10. Be prepared to work on feedback after an interview as it will help at second stage or if unsuccessful help for your next interview.

This is not an exhaustive list of tips but hopefully it may give you some help and/or inspiration. Getting the right job does take a lot of time but things can happen for a reason, even though you may not know the reason at this moment!

To discuss your own situation in more detail contact our team on 0845 026 2020 or visit the website to view a selection of our current nationwide opportunities www.2020selection.co.uk

What I Wish I’d known As A Hiring Manager……….

December 13, 2010

It’s been almost a year since I joined 20:20 Selection Ltd as a Recruitment Consultant; and as we approach the shortest day and start the wind down for Christmas, I feel that it’s a good time to reflect on what I’ve learned over the last twelve months.

Firstly, I’ve realised that in the world of recruitment there isn’t a wind down for Christmas at all! In fact, at 20:20 Selection Limited we are still flat out busy, working on new vacancies as well as existing ones, for our clients who want jobs offered and filled over the next two weeks, in time for ITC’s on 4th January. I had naively thought that we would be starting on the mince pies and sherry by now, but in fact I suspect that the Season’s merriments won’t begin until 4pm on Friday 24th December.

When I was a hiring manager, both as a Regional Business Manager, and as a National Manager, I thought I knew quite a bit about recruitment. I thought I knew how to spot an outstanding candidate from an average one. I thought I knew how to really dig down deep to get to know the ‘face behind the mask’, so that I could recruit the best of the best; the gem who would fit into the team quickly and would add value from day one.

What I’ve now realised, is just how little I actually knew about recruitment when I was a hiring manager.

If only I’d known that:

  • An awful lot of work goes on behind the scenes, long before a manager receives CV’s to review.

 

  • For every strong potential candidate, the best agencies reject another hundred CV’s from the ‘Average Joe’.

 

  • The recruitment industry is incredibly competitive, with most clients now choosing a multi agency Preferred Supplier List.

 

  • Achieving exclusivity with a client, is worth it’s weight in gold, as it gives the agency the luxury of time to really match the best candidates to every role, and to deliver all the KPI’s, without being pulled into the ‘bun fight’ of trying to speak to candidates about a job first before the other agencies get to them.

 

  • Candidate loyalty only comes from delivering outstanding service. If people are registered with too many recruitment agencies, it is actually much more difficult to find them a job.

 

  • Not all agencies are ethical and professional, and some still work on a volume principle, sending far too many CV’s out for a vacancy, rather than only selecting candidate’s who really fit the brief.

 

  • We’re all fishing from the same candidate pool, and only the most skilled and experienced recruitment consultants know which bait to use to attract the most suitable, highest calibre people.

 

  • The world of recruitment is full of highs and lows. Nothing beats the feeling of placing a candidate in their perfect job. Equally, nothing matches the heart sink feeling when your super prepped candidate gets down to the last two, and gets beaten by a whisker.

 

  • It is extremely hard work, energy draining and soul destroying at times. It is also the most fulfilling, satisfying, people focused job I’ve ever done.

 

  • The role of the recruitment consultant is the ultimate selling role. You need to sell to clients to win the business in the first place, sell the job and the company culture to candidates and to sell candidates’ to hiring managers to encourage them to shortlist your people.

 

  • The term KAM is overused, and means so many different things to different companies and different people.

 

  • The pharmaceutical market place is very still unstable. Candidates seem to have very high expectations about their employability, and so a key part of the recruitment consultant’s job is to manage expectations and to really explore motivation in a very competitive environment.

 

  • As more and more companies choose to install electronic CV logging systems, it becomes increasingly difficult to ‘sell’ the candidates into hiring managers. Therefore, it is even more critical for a candidate’s CV to be absolutely outstanding, to differentiate them from the rest of the crowd, and to be as clear and as achievement focused as it can possibly be.

 

So, one year ends and another is just around the corner. I have learned a huge amount over the last 12 months, both about my job as a Recruitment Consultant, and also about myself, my own motivation and what makes me smile. I’d forgotten the buzz that is to be had from working in the toughest sales arenas, and I’d forgotten just how much I still want to win and to succeed. Every day is different, every day is action packed, and every day I live on my wits, and I’m ready to deal with anything that comes my way. I’m looking forward to the Christmas break, but I’m also optimistic and hopeful that 2011 will be a very fruitful year for 20:20 Selection Limited and for our selected candidates.

by Sam Harrison

QIPP

October 21, 2010

FACTSHEET

WHAT IS QIPP?

The QIPP agenda is undoubtedly one of the most significant NHS policies that all organisations who conduct business with the NHS will have to take onboard.

Quality

Innovation

Productivity

Prevention

The agenda will have to run through the every thought and every process that takes place throughout the NHS from Primary Care Trusts to Secondary Care to General Practice.

QIPP will affect every department and individual who works for the NHS – for example front line clinicians, PCT commissioners, estate managers, laundry services, ward staff, ambulance trusts, etc.

Why?

The year 2010/11 is the last year in which the £102 billion that is spent on the NHS is set to get an increase in funding of around 5.5%. For the foreseeable future the growth will be limited to inflation. The NHS needs to identify £15-£20 billion of efficiency savings by the end of 2013/14 that can be reinvested within the service so that it can continue to deliver year on year quality improvements.

HOW WILL QIPP AFFECT PHARMA?

 

In order to do business with the NHS in future, organisations will need to focus on how the products/services that they offer fit in with the local QIPP agenda. Clearly organisations will have to attain immediate overviews as to how the QIPP agenda is going to be adopted at local levels, as it is anticipated that new, complex information resources will be required to deliver tailored solutions for each NHS customer.

PCTs will be looking to move services into primary care to reduce cost and improve Quality and Productivity. Pharmaceutical companies are already working on how to utilise their existing knowledge of World Class Commissioning to drive their targeting and market access strategies – so the platform may already be there, but the message will need refining for the QIPP.

Specifically, some of the areas which the pharmaceutical industry might be concentrating on refining their messages and strategies could include:

  • to reduce preventable hospital admissions resulting from sub-optimal medicines use in chronic medical conditions (e.g. COPD)
  • to identify patients who are currently undiagnosed or misdiagnosed as having a treatable chronic medical condition (e.g. COPD, diabetes, cardiovascular disease)
  • to improve medical adherence and thereby improve health outcomes and reduce waste by reducing levels of non-adherence to medicines (e.g. community pharmacy monitoring schemes, GP staff training)
  • to improve adherence to NICE guidance (e.g. hypertension, DVT prevention)

 

RECOMMENDED EXAMPLES

There have already been some significant improvements made to Quality and Productivity and Department of Health has provided some recommended examples.

Opportunistic screening by pulse palpation of patients over 65 has been used in 18 regions to improve detection of atrial fibrillation. Quality is improved by the optimal treatment of patients with atrial fibrillation reducing risk of stroke. Productivity is increased by the reduction in costs associated with stroke and its complications.

Ten pilot trusts have succesfully implemented service re-design for the Fractured Neck Femur patient pathway. This improved quality by: improving multi discplinary and cross agency teamworking, reducing mortality, and time to theatre, and earlier mobilisation. Productivity was improved by reduced length of stay, readmissions, and delays to the theatre.

The NHS Institute supported Chief Executives and senior leadership to champion change and improvement across NHS organisations in all areas of the stroke pathway. Quality was improved by reducing mortality, time in A&E, and delay in CT scanning. Productivity was increased through reduction in length of stay and readmission.

The NHS Institute has supported ward leaders and nursing teams with innovative methods to improve the ward environment and process. Over 60% of NHS Acute Trusts are implementing the Productive Ward programme. Key improvements from the programme include improved quality through increasing direct patient care time and staff satisfaction and improved productivity through reduced staff absence and reduced length of hospital stay.

Oxford Radcliffe Hospitals have successfully implemented an electronic blood transfusion system. This has improved quality by reducing transfusion errors and the time taken to deliver blood. Productivity has improved by reduced blood usage, wastage, and staff time.

Enhanced recovery programmes use evidence based interventions to improve pre-, intra-, and postoperative care. They have enabled early recovery, discharge from hospital, and more rapid return to normal activities. Quality is increased by reducing complications and enabling a more rapid return to function. Productivity is improved by reducing hospital stay.

To improve the uptake of QIPP by clinicians the Department of Health has published a guide entitled:  The NHS Quality, Innovation, Productivity and Prevention Challenge: an introduction for clinicians www.somaxa.com/docs/file/QIPP_2010.pdf

Further information on QIPP can be found at:

www.link-gov.org/content/view/463/188/

www.library.nhs.uk/qipp/

 

Securing your next role – What NOT to do!

May 7, 2010

Landing a job is never easy, as the industry is now in a state of flux it is more competitive these days. There are fewer vacancies and more people chasing them than in more than a decade. But even now — more than ever — it’s still on you. Despite the fact that the job market is everything but easy right now… have you ever stopped to consider that the reason you’re still sitting there unemployed … might in fact be … you?

It’s a hard concept that most job seekers have trouble wrapping their heads around, but applicants frequently — inadvertently — raise red flags to recruiting managers that immediately scream, “Don’t employ me!” You might not be raising them on purpose, but there are ways to avoid them.

Not sure if you’re unknowingly blowing your chances at securing your dream position? Here are 10 red flags to be wary of during your next job hunt:

 

Red flag No. 1: Your CV is lacking any specific achievements that distinguish you from other Medical Representatives

When you’re crafting your CV, you should focus on highlighting relevant skills and accomplishments that are in line with the position for which you are applying. Highlighting your sales successes is key!

 

Red flag No. 2: You have long gaps between jobs on your CV

Even if your long departure from the work force is valid, extended lapses of unemployment might say to an employer, “Why weren’t you wanted by anyone?” Anytime you have more than a three-month gap of idleness on your CV, legitimate or otherwise, be prepared to explain yourself.

 

Red flag No. 3: You aren’t prepared for the interview

There are many ways to be unprepared for an interview: You haven’t researched the company, you haven’t researched the products & therapy area, you don’t have any questions prepared, etc. Plain and simple, do your homework before an interview. Explore the company online, prepare answers to Competency Based questions and have someone give you a mock interview. The more prepared you are, the more employers will take you seriously.

 

Red flag No. 4: You didn’t provide any evidence of success

In today’s competitive market use of evidence/brag file can be the difference between progressing to the next stage and being told that there ‘where stronger people on the day.’  You need to prove how successful you have been (the more specific you can be the better) and differentiate yourself from other candidates.  Do not wait to be asked for your evidence, use it as a sales aid to illustrate your answers.  YOU are your product!

 

Red flag No. 5: You only have negative things to say about previous employment

If you feel aggrieved or down-beat about your current/prior employer, it could be very tempting to want to tell anyone who will listen how much of ‘bad time’ you have experienced– but a recruiting manager for a coveted job is not that person. There are hundreds of ways to turn negative things about an old job into positives. Thought your last job was a dead end? Spin it by saying, “I felt I had gone as far as I could go in that position. I’m looking for something with more opportunity for advancement.”

 

Red flag No. 6: You’ve held seven different jobs — in the past six years

Job hopping is a new trend in the working world. Workers are no longer staying in a job for 10-20 years; they stay for a couple and move on to the next one. While such a tactic can further your career, switching jobs too often will raise a prospective employer’s antenna. Too many jobs in too little time tells employers that either you can’t hold a job or you have no loyalty. Be prepared to explain your reasoning/rationale

 

Red flag No. 7: You give inconsistent answers in your interview

One tactic recruiting manager’s use during the recruitment process is to ask you the same question in several different ways. This is mostly to ensure that you’re genuine with your answers and not just telling an employer what he or she wants to hear. Keep your responses sincere throughout the entire process and you should be good to go.

 

Red flag No. 8: You lack flexibility

Most people know what they want in a job as far as benefits, basic salary, bonus, etc. If you’re unable to be flexible with some of your (unrealistic?) expectations, however, you’re going to have a difficult time finding a job. Have a bottom line in terms of what you want before you start the job hunting process and be willing to bend a bit if necessary.

 

Red flag No. 9: Your application was — in a word – lazy

Only doing the bare minimum of what’s asked of you won’t get very far — in life or in your job search. Applying to jobs with the same CV and the same cover letter (or none at all) is pure laziness. And, if you won’t spend extra time on yourself and your application materials, you probably won’t do it for a client either.

 

Red flag No. 10: You lack objective or ambition

If you have no long-term goals, then you really have no short-term goals either. Long-term goals may change, however you need to have some concept of where you want to go. Know where you want to go and how you plan to get there. Otherwise you seem unfocused and unmotivated, which are two big no-no’s for an applicant.

We are specialists in Medical & Pharmaceutical Recruitment, to secure your next role in this sector call us at 20:20 Selection Ltd on 0845 026 2020 and speak to one of our consultants or visit www.2020selection.co.uk to view our current Medical Sales vacancies

(Adapted from CareerBuilder)

Pharmaceutical Sales – A spark of interest

April 23, 2010

Having embarked on a career as a medical representative in 1987, I still reflect on the route that led me to the pharmaceutical industry.  Being a Pharmaceutical Sales Representative doesn’t often appear in the list of careers that we aspire to as teenagers hence it is invariably something people come across coincidently.  For me I spent five years in a hospital Biochemistry Dept completing post graduate studies and developing a strong clinical understanding of various diseases and illnesses.  It was here I met Sales Representatives selling laboratory diagnostics and equipment which sparked an interest in sales (I have to admit to being initially impressed by the suit, car and perceived flexibility of their job).  In fact what did appeal to me about a sales role was the inherent challenges working towards targets and ultimately being rewarded (bonus) and recognised for exceeding goals (working in the NHS could not fulfil that need) as well as selling products which genuinely make a difference to people’s lives.

Hence I started buying the New Scientist and Daily Telegraph; there was no internet job searching in those days! Quite quickly I secured two interviews for Laboratory Territory Manager positions before seeing an advertisement for Trainee Medical Representatives with a major pharmaceutical company.

Have to confess at that stage that pharmaceuticals was a bit of a mystery to me, but my Dad said that company was great (blue-chip), and there was a number to call to apply.  Two interviews later, including being flown to head office, I was offered a GP/Hospital Representative position.

Looking back I do wonder how I got that job as these days we expect entry level candidates to know so much more about the day to day practicalities of the role, the NHS and how the business works.  Clearly the company were looking for the basic ingredients which they could then train, develop and mould to reflect their values and culture in the eyes of their customers;  GP, Nurses, Pharmacists, Consultants, Registrars, SHO etc.

Over twenty years later in a different NHS landscape I still believe this to be true so what are some of those basics;

Personal Qualities – An inner drive, self-starter, the ability to work on your own initiative, enthusiasm, can-do attitude, tenacity, the ability to problem solve, good interpersonal skills, the willingness as well as aptitude to learn.

Clinical Foundation – This means an interest in medicine, the ability to learn and apply technical information.  You will need to communicate this knowledge to customers of all levels.  ‘A’ level standard Biology should help with ABPI. 

Business & Selling Skills – Understand you are there to increase sales; it is a sales job & not a promotional or educational position.  Have a consultative selling style, i.e. probe to understand the customer needs and agenda before offering solutions. Key Account Management & Networking Skills. Understanding local NHS politics, targets, agenda and how these may impact on your business.

Clearly a lot of clinical and business skills can be taught as long as you have the right positive attitude. In summary I would describe the role of a Medical Sales Representative, whether that be GP, GP/Hospital, Hospital or Generics as the opportunity to run your own local business.

I have enjoyed a varied, challenging and satisfying career in the pharmaceutical industry. I also know others, who embarked on their career at the same time, who have had similar experiences and taken their careers in to different functions in the industry including: Marketing, Senior Sales Management, Training, Consultancy as well as others who are now Senior Representatives such as Hospital Specialist Representative or Healthcare Development Manager.

If this sparks an interest in you fantastic!  To discuss your background and transferable skills then contact 20:20 Selection Ltd on 0845 026 2020 or visit www.2020selection.co.uk . We have current opportunities Nationwide with hot-spots in London, Kent, Sussex, Essex, Somerset, Wiltshire, East Anglia.

Interview Guidance

February 4, 2010

Interview Guidance

PRIOR TO the Interview

Research

  • Look committed and find out as much as possible about the company.

 

  • Visit their web site for more information on the company.

 

  • Find out who will your competitors be and as much as possible about the market/customers you will be selling to 

 

Job Description

  • Make sure you are fully aware what the role is you are being interviewed for.  Your consultant at 20:20 Selection Ltd will have fully briefed you on this. 

 

  • Be confident that you are technically qualified to do the job.  We would not have spoken to you about the role if we didn’t think your profile matched the client’s criteria!

 

  • Have examples from your previous roles to demonstrate your ability to do this job and evidence in your brag file to back this up

 

FOR THE INTERVIEW

Personal Presentation

  • Look your smartest and show your most professional side during the interview. A company is more likely to employ someone who is well presented and who will therefore best represent their company to customers. 

 

Punctuality

  • Arrive to start the interview on time (be early if possible)

 

  • Obtain clear directions for the location of the interview and plan your journey, allowing plenty of time to arrive.

 

INTERVIEW DO’S

  • Introduce yourself courteously (first impressions last!)

 

  • Express yourself clearly.

 

  • Show tact, manners, courtesy, and maturity at every opportunity.

 

  • Be confident and maintain poise. The ability to handle your nerves during the interview will come across as confidence in your ability to handle the job.

 

  • Be prepared to show how your experience would benefit the company.

 

  • Ask questions concerning the company or products and the position for which you are being interviewed for. An interviewer will be impressed by an eager and inquisitive mind. You will also be able to demonstrate that you can contribute to the company or industry if you show an interest in its products and/or services.

 

  • Take time to think and construct your answers to questions to avoid rushing into a vague and senseless reply.
  • Demonstrate that you are sufficiently motivated to get the job done well and that you will fit in with the company’s organisational structure and the team in which you will work.

 

  • Show willingness to start at the bottom and work up.

 

  • Anticipate questions you’re likely to be asked and have answers prepared in advance. Uncertainty and disorganisation show the interviewer that you are unprepared and unclear what your goals are.

 

  • Be assertive without being aggressive (ensure you close – remember you are a sales person & ‘you’ are your product)

 

  • Thank the interviewer for their time

 

Interview Don’ts

  • Be late for the interview. Tardiness is a sign of irresponsibility or disorganisation and the employer could take it as what to expect in the future.

 

  • Arrive unprepared for the interview.

 

  • Say unfavourable things about previous employers.

 

  • Make excuses for failings.

 

  • Give vague responses to questions.

 

  • Show lack of career planning – no goals or purpose could convey the impression you’re merely shopping around or only want the job for a short time.

 

  • Show too much concern about rapid advancement.

 

  • Overemphasise money. Your interviewing goal is to sell yourself to the interviewer and to get an offer of employment. Salary discussion is secondary.

 

  • Show any reservations you may have about the role/company. You can always turn down second interviews and job offers after you have had time to appraise your concerns in the cold light of day.

 

  • Express strong prejudices or any personal intolerance.

 

  • Leave your mobile phone on during the interview.

 

These are general tips that can be applied to any interview situation.  Part of the service we offer at 20:20 Selection Ltd is to help you prepare for specific client interviews.  We have key account managers specifically working with clients & members of the team who come from a pharmaceutical sales management background so you will get personalised expert advice relating to your interview!  To find out more about 20:20 Selection Ltd visit www.2020selection.co.uk